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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 8:13 am 
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https://cranntara.scot/crannta.htm

“Crann Tara” translated means “Fiery Cross” its reason for existance was communication between the clans. Here is a short hiostory of how it came to be, and its amazing significance to the Scots as a nation.

[snip]

The “Fiery Cross” was the modern day equivalent of an aircraft squadrons ‘scramble' call. Each clan had a certain rendezvous point, and all the men capable of fighting were expected to be there, armed and ready for action.

[snip]

The western portions of Virginia and the Carolinas, the northern portions of Georgia and Alabama, and most of Tennessee, were settled by the hardy race of Scottish-Irish, in whose veins the Scottish blood was still warm, and vibrant.

The writer Thomas Dixon, in "The Clansman," makes mention of the use of the "Fiery Cross" in the rites and ceremonies of the Ku-Klux Klan, which organization originated and flourished among the Scottish-Irish of those regions.

[snip][end]

Image

Were Scots responsible for the Ku Klux Klan?
http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/z3xhhv4

The Klan’s influence was dramatically reduced by the laws and by 1872, Klan violence had ended. But in 1905 a man of Scots descent reignited racial tension with the publication of a novel.

Thomas Dixon, the son of a Scots minister and plantation owner, wrote The Clansman: A Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan, which was set in a time where whites are enslaved and black men are in charge.
Dixon drew from his Scots heritage by introducing the idea of the burning cross as a symbol of the Klan, even though it had never before been associated with the group. He based it on the Crann Tara, a fiery cross which had been a traditional means of calling Scottish clans to arms.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saltire

The Flag of Scotland, called The Saltire or Saint Andrew's Cross, is a blue field with a white saltire. According to tradition, it represents Saint Andrew, who is supposed to have been crucified on a cross of that form (called a crux decussata) at Patras, Greece.

The Saint Andrew's Cross was worn as a badge on hats in Scotland, on the day of the feast of Saint Andrew.[1]

In the politics of Scotland, both the Scottish National Party and Scottish Conservative Party use stylised saltires as their party logos, deriving from the flag of Scotland.

[snip]

The design is also part of the Confederate Battle Flag and Naval Jack used during the American Civil War (see Flags of the Confederate States of America). Arthur L. Rogers, designer of the final version of the Confederate National flag, claimed that it was based on the saltire of Scotland.

[snip][end]

Image
Flag of Scotland

Image
Confederate Naval Jack

https://www.splcenter.org/fighting-hate ... n-overseas

The first American Klansmen claimed Scottish descent ("Klan" derives from the Scottish clans) and then, as now, saw Celtic-Scottish history as a heroic struggle of oppressed whites.

Later, the Klan adopted cross-burning based on a system of signalling used by Scottish clans in the 14th century. The practice was popularized as a terrorist technique in the 1905 American novel, The Clansman, by Thomas Dixon.

Even the recent movie Braveheart, starring Mel Gibson, has risen to the status of mythology in the minds of American Klansmen. The movie portrays the life of William Wallace, hero of the Scottish struggle for independence against the English. Among the many favorable reviewers is Louis Beam, a notorious former Texas Klan leader.

[snip][end]

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-- Tis an ill wind that blows no minds.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 11:07 am 
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https://cranntara.scot/crannta.htm

“Crann Tara” translated means “Fiery Cross” its reason for existance was communication between the clans. Here is a short hiostory of how it came to be, and its amazing significance to the Scots as a nation.

[snip]

The “Fiery Cross” was the modern day equivalent of an aircraft squadrons ‘scramble' call. Each clan had a certain rendezvous point, and all the men capable of fighting were expected to be there, armed and ready for action.

[snip]

The western portions of Virginia and the Carolinas, the northern portions of Georgia and Alabama, and most of Tennessee, were settled by the hardy race of Scottish-Irish, in whose veins the Scottish blood was still warm, and vibrant.

The writer Thomas Dixon, in "The Clansman," makes mention of the use of the "Fiery Cross" in the rites and ceremonies of the Ku-Klux Klan, which organization originated and flourished among the Scottish-Irish of those regions.

[snip][end]

Image

Were Scots responsible for the Ku Klux Klan?
http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/z3xhhv4

The Klan’s influence was dramatically reduced by the laws and by 1872, Klan violence had ended. But in 1905 a man of Scots descent reignited racial tension with the publication of a novel.

Thomas Dixon, the son of a Scots minister and plantation owner, wrote The Clansman: A Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan, which was set in a time where whites are enslaved and black men are in charge.
Dixon drew from his Scots heritage by introducing the idea of the burning cross as a symbol of the Klan, even though it had never before been associated with the group. He based it on the Crann Tara, a fiery cross which had been a traditional means of calling Scottish clans to arms.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saltire

The Flag of Scotland, called The Saltire or Saint Andrew's Cross, is a blue field with a white saltire. According to tradition, it represents Saint Andrew, who is supposed to have been crucified on a cross of that form (called a crux decussata) at Patras, Greece.

The Saint Andrew's Cross was worn as a badge on hats in Scotland, on the day of the feast of Saint Andrew.[1]

In the politics of Scotland, both the Scottish National Party and Scottish Conservative Party use stylised saltires as their party logos, deriving from the flag of Scotland.

[snip]

The design is also part of the Confederate Battle Flag and Naval Jack used during the American Civil War (see Flags of the Confederate States of America). Arthur L. Rogers, designer of the final version of the Confederate National flag, claimed that it was based on the saltire of Scotland.

[snip][end]

Image
Flag of Scotland

Image
Confederate Naval Jack

https://www.splcenter.org/fighting-hate ... n-overseas

The first American Klansmen claimed Scottish descent ("Klan" derives from the Scottish clans) and then, as now, saw Celtic-Scottish history as a heroic struggle of oppressed whites.

Later, the Klan adopted cross-burning based on a system of signalling used by Scottish clans in the 14th century. The practice was popularized as a terrorist technique in the 1905 American novel, The Clansman, by Thomas Dixon.

Even the recent movie Braveheart, starring Mel Gibson, has risen to the status of mythology in the minds of American Klansmen. The movie portrays the life of William Wallace, hero of the Scottish struggle for independence against the English. Among the many favorable reviewers is Louis Beam, a notorious former Texas Klan leader.

[snip][end]


Some of them, depending on locale, also self-identify as Crackers.

From "Craic" to "Cracker" - Ken Johnston, living history performance artist, writing for the Rural Florida Living History Museum newsletter, Cracker Country

Quote:
The origin of Cracker is to be found in the word "craic", from Gaelic, the old language family of such Celtic peoples as the Irish and the Scots. Among the Irish it could mean "entertaining talk" or "boisterous and bragging", and as the Irish enjoy immensely such spirited talk craic also meant "fun or a good time". Meanwhile, in Scotland, it was used to designate independent yeoman who were obnoxious to the aristocracy (presumably from speaking their minds in typical dour and emphatic Scottish fashion). While the word craic was used by both the Irish and Scots (who raided and traded among themselves), it was also appropriated by their English subjugators; being "anglicized" in the process to "cracker" and meaning "braggart" or "fast talker". It was used in this sense as early as 1595 by William Shakespeare in his play King John, Act 2 sc 1, when he has the Duke of Austria say of the fiery Philip—"What Cracker is this same that deafs our ears with this abundance of superfluous breath?"


More in link.

Florida Crackers have a distinct history, as well, and a noted reputation for, well...let's just say, my mother's grandmother was part Scotch-Irish. This is an attempt to not use any profanity in this post.

Florida Cracker Culture - Florida Historical Society/Brevard Museum.

Florida state flag is also based on St. Andrew's Cross

Image

BOAN-minded people love the St. Andrew's cross because it reinforces their martyr identity.

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Last edited by carmenjonze on Wed Nov 28, 2018 11:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 11:18 am 
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Location: Sunny South Florida
Yeah, I went to the Florida Cracker Folklife festival back when I lived in Gainesville.

One of our last Democratic governors, Lawton Chiles, here in Florida, often talked about his Cracker heritage.

A lot of people think the term "Cracker" for white people comes from their resemblances to the color of Saltines. Essentially another slur.

When I went to that Festival, there was a lot of talk about that name coming from the wagon pioneers rolling into Florida, cracking their whips. You know that for Florida Crackers, they don't view that term as a slur, but rather as a source of pride. Like I said, Chiles often bragged about it.

So, BTW, I wouldn't doubt the possibility the etymology goes back to the Scots-Irish.

_________________
-- Tis an ill wind that blows no minds.
Malaclypse the Younger


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