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PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2017 8:04 pm 
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FCC approves first wireless 'power-at-a-distance' charging system

The WattUp Mid Field transmitter refills batteries from 3 feet away.

Charging your mobile device wirelessly is certainly less of a hassle than plugging it in, but still requires the device be in physical contact with its station to actually work. That's about to change now that the Federal Communications Commission has approved the first wireless charger that works from up to three feet away.

https://www.engadget.com/2017/12/26/fcc ... ing-syste/


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2017 8:14 pm 
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Nikola Tesla for the win!

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 27, 2017 8:40 pm 
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I've seen them in a store. Rite Aid had one for the Christmas shoppers, for charging an I Phone.

They'd be about as efficient as farming with Oxen.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 3:10 pm 
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3 feet?!?!?!??!!?

That has to be one hell of an RF field. Either it takes all night to charge anything, or the thing is a fairly powerful transmitter that can jam communications in a half mile radius. What's its transmitting frequency? How clean is its signal? Who just lost use of the airwaves? What are the health hazards? Who will die when emergency responders can't communicate? Does anyone even care?

I suppose the FCC had other priorities, like turning Internet into commercial broadcasting.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 7:49 pm 
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this supports my atari 2600 theory that all new technology is really old and cheesy we just dont know that it is at first.

www.youtube.com Video from : www.youtube.com


so they are basically using a radio transmitter as a transformer

www.youtube.com Video from : www.youtube.com


Wireless charging company Energous jumps 271 percent this week after its technology gets FCC approval

www.youtube.com Video from : www.youtube.com

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 29, 2017 10:35 pm 
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3 feet?!?!?!??!!?

That has to be one hell of an RF field. Either it takes all night to charge anything, or the thing is a fairly powerful transmitter that can jam communications in a half mile radius. What's its transmitting frequency? How clean is its signal? Who just lost use of the airwaves? What are the health hazards? Who will die when emergency responders can't communicate? Does anyone even care?

I suppose the FCC had other priorities, like turning Internet into commercial broadcasting.


It sounds to me like the FCC is going to take the let the manufactures decide which frequency bands they want to pollute in the 100 kHz LF up to the 900 MHz UHF approach. With as far as I can tell only the 90-110 kHz band restricted. That's the Loran radio navigation band.

Apparently better efficiency lies in the 1 to 49 MHz range for fixed frequency design. But for adaptive resonance some design outfits apparently want to go as high as 900 MHz.

Kiss amateur radio goodbye. :|

https://apps.fcc.gov/kdb/GetAttachment. ... mber=41701

There is a thing called the AirFuel Resonant with AirFuel Alliance standards

http://www.airfuel.org/what-is-airfuel/ ... -resonant/

They're playing coy with their standards specification though, only their members can download them. :(

This Air Fuel consortium appears to have been created by a merger or previous consortium one of which, Rezence, specified the 6.78 MHz frequency in their standards and they go up to about 40 watts with 5 to 15 being typical. They're the systems which are rolling out now.

The other outfit in that merger, Power Matters Alliance are the ones who appear to be coy about publishing their proposed standards. Starbucks have a stake in the Power Matters Alliance, they want this for their coffee shops.


They talk about having super high efficiency like in the 70% and above range. That's advertisement gobbledygook where they create an efficiency calculation system which ignores the real inefficiency. Kind of like horsepower for car engines is done, where say 25 real HP will be referred to as being something big and monstrous like 300 HP. 35 HP will be 450 HP

Yeah, most cars have somewhere between 25 to 35 real HP. :|


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 30, 2017 3:30 pm 
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That's certainly been the approach with HomePlug Ethernet adapters, which (as a side effect) turn house wiring into very efficient antenna systems all the way from just above the AM band to sometimes 300 MHz. The ARRL got them to notch out the amateur radio bands, but the notching works best when they test it under optimum conditions in bought-off labs. It gets pretty sketchy out in the field.

They're having a much worse problem in the UK, where a lot of the old wiring is simply one huge loop of everything in the structure, with the plugs individually fused. Their version of power line Ethernet can remove all use of the MF/HF/low VHF spectrum in a half mile radius. This increases to several miles, if it feeds into power company's mains. GCHQ, their version of NSA, got pissed. Nothing changed.

Same in the UK as here. The regulatory bodies never met an importer they didn't like. It's all about free markets and all that crap.

Thing is... there's already a health issue with cell phones. That's at a more injurious frequency. There are also some minor issues with Wi-Fi. Now, deploying millions of what are basically transmitters with very high power densities and wide field strengths makes both of these look like the peanut whistles they are, by comparison.

It's a lousy idea, just so some yutz can lay a cell phone a few feet away instead of putting it on something.

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--"Winning CNN Wars," Army War College

"One bomb was shown on TV, and the American people bought that war. War is show business."
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 31, 2017 4:04 am 
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That's certainly been the approach with HomePlug Ethernet adapters, which (as a side effect) turn house wiring into very efficient antenna systems all the way from just above the AM band to sometimes 300 MHz. The ARRL got them to notch out the amateur radio bands, but the notching works best when they test it under optimum conditions in bought-off labs. It gets pretty sketchy out in the field.

They're having a much worse problem in the UK, where a lot of the old wiring is simply one huge loop of everything in the structure, with the plugs individually fused. Their version of power line Ethernet can remove all use of the MF/HF/low VHF spectrum in a half mile radius. This increases to several miles, if it feeds into power company's mains. GCHQ, their version of NSA, got pissed. Nothing changed.

Same in the UK as here. The regulatory bodies never met an importer they didn't like. It's all about free markets and all that crap.

Thing is... there's already a health issue with cell phones. That's at a more injurious frequency. There are also some minor issues with Wi-Fi. Now, deploying millions of what are basically transmitters with very high power densities and wide field strengths makes both of these look like the peanut whistles they are, by comparison.

It's a lousy idea, just so some yutz can lay a cell phone a few feet away instead of putting it on something.


Starbucks®

I bet 50 percent of the push to create a business consortium to create this wireless battery charging system originates with Starbucks®.

That came to mind even before I read that they are involved because I've serviced so many of their refrigerated cases and ice machines in so many of their shops all over Northern California. I bet I've been in 400 of their shops and been in most of them many times.

There are 27,339 Starbucks stores around the world.

One thing I saw in every one of those blasted shops was a shortage of outlets near tables. The average shop would have two or three tables near enough to a wall outlet that a customer could sit at a table and plug into an outlet and use that wireless Internet connection, sip coffee eat muffins and such and waste away their hours in a day.

They can't allow extension cords, spliters and patchwork wiring to be strewn about between tables because of trip, slip and fall liability.


The reason I noticed all of this was a fair number of those outlets and the few tables they were near were below a hatch high up on a wall which when removed allowed me to get at the backside of their ice machines.

When I had to work on one of those ice machines I had to shoo those customers away from those precious outlets. I'd go out to the truck for something and when I returned I would have to chase them away again. Sometimes I would be up on my ladder and they'd move in and get situated under me even bumping into my ladder in their press to get at that almighty power. They'd even move my stuff around to make a place for their computer when I turned my back to deal with that machine.

Rude aggressive people. Starbucks® coffee shops are our modern day equivalent of 19th century Opium dens, except instead of sleeping it off on mats a coffee habit jacks them up and they surf the web.



I'll do some math. With this wireless power perhaps 20 people with a 30 dollar a day Starbucks® habit can be situated in a shop instead of 4 or 5. And as an added advantage they will no longer be fighting among themselves over that power. There is turnover during a day, perhaps 100 people a day with a 30 dollar a day habit will be served who are not currently being served. This power will keeps them in the store longer and perhaps now they will spend 40 dollars a day.

Instead of what they now have, perhaps 25 people during the day spending 30 dollars

(100 x 40 x 27,339 x 365) - (25 x 30 x 27,339 x 365) = 39914940000 - 7484051250 = 32,430,888,750

I estimate 32.4 billion dollars a year in added gross sales, that's how big a deal I think this is for Starbucks®.


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