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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 4:12 pm 
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This is a good article. We're only at the beginning of this research, but it needs to go forward.

Brain Scientists Look Beyond Opioids To Conquer Pain
https://www.npr.org/sections/health-sho ... nquer-pain

The goal is simple: a drug that can relieve chronic pain without causing addiction.

But achieving that goal has proved difficult, says Edward Bilsky, a pharmacologist who serves as the provost and chief academic officer at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences in Yakima, Wash.

"We know a lot more about pain and addiction than we used to," says Bilsky, "But it's been hard to get a practical drug."

Bilsky is moderating a panel on pain, addiction and opioid abuse at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in Washington, D.C., this week.

Brain scientists have become increasingly interested in pain and addiction as opioid use has increased. About 2 million people in the U.S. now abuse opioids, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But at least 25 million people suffer from chronic pain, according to an analysis by the National Institutes of Health. That means they have experienced daily pain for more than three months.

The question is how to cut opioid abuse without hurting people who live with pain. And brain scientists think they are getting closer to an answer.

One approach is to find drugs that decrease pain without engaging the brain's pleasure and reward circuits the way opioids do, Bilsky says. So far, these drugs have been hampered by dangerous side effects or proved less effective than opioids at reducing pain.

But substances related to snail venom look promising, Bilsky says.

The cone snail uses its venom to paralyze fish. And scientists discovered that this venom contains substances that act as powerful painkillers. And because these substances do not affect the same brain circuits that opioids do, they have the potential to be much less addictive.

At least one drug related to snail venom is already on the market, though it's not widely used because it must be injected into the spinal column.

Another new approach to pain management involves targeting brain circuits that can amplify or dampen our perception of pain.

[snip][end]

Perhaps in the future, neural implants might actually target pain mechanisms within the brain, dampening chronic, inescapable pain.

The snail venom drug sounds interesting, but I don't know how many people will enjoy repeated injections into their spinal column.

There have to be others out there like it.

EDIT: found the name of that drug. BTW, you can't swallow it, but there may be other ways to inject it into the body.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ziconotide

Snail venom compound 'offers chronic pain therapy'
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-39028557

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Last edited by ProfessorX on Thu Mar 08, 2018 4:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 4:26 pm 
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These New Devices Promise to Fight Pain without Opioids
Companies want to replace addictive painkillers and help people detox from opioids
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/6082 ... t-opioids/

The therapy is known as neuromodulation or neurostimulation, and scientists think it works by interrupting the pain signals that are carried from the nerves to the brain. The idea has been around since the 1960s, but in recent years the technology has undergone rapid innovation. While drug developers are trying to discover new nonaddictive medicine to treat pain, medical device manufacturers are racing to develop smaller, more comfortable implants as well as external devices that don’t require surgery. The stimulator Bryant got, called the Senza System, is one of a growing number of medical devices to treat pain.

[snip]

Despite Americans’ overall pain remaining the same, the amount of opioids prescribed per person was three times higher in 2015 than in 1999, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meanwhile, an estimated two million people in the U.S. abused prescription opioid pain relievers in 2015. As the use of opioids in the U.S. skyrockets, new medical devices could be a drug-free alternative for some patients. For others already addicted to opioids, this technology may instead help alleviate the pain of withdrawal.

[snip]

The first spinal cord stimulator was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1989, and since then, medical device giants Medtronic, Boston Scientific, and St. Jude Medical have dominated the neuromodulation market. Patients use an external remote control to adjust or turn off the stimulation. Over time, these devices have gotten smaller and more comfortable for patients, but they're known to cause a tingling sensation called paresthesia, says Leong.

The device Bryant got is manufactured by a new competitor on the market, California-based Nevro, and gained FDA approval in 2015. In contrast to older spinal cord stimulators, it delivers high-frequency stimulation that can’t be felt by the patient. A two-year study of 198 patients published last year found that the Nevro device was better at relieving back and leg pain compared with traditional spinal cord stimulation devices.

[snip]

For patients who may be turned off by the idea of an implant, a growing number of startups are developing devices that can be used outside the body and don’t require surgery. These devices stimulate what are known as peripheral nerves, the network of nerves that connect the brain and the spinal cord.

One of those is Cleveland-based SPR Therapeutics, which received FDA clearance last year to commercialize its peripheral nerve stimulation device for acute and chronic pain.

The device includes a tiny, coiled wire and a lightweight, matchbox-sized wearable stimulator. In a simple nonsurgical procedure, the wire is placed under the skin near a nerve and connects externally to the stimulator, which patients can wear on their arm or elsewhere on the body.

So far, the device has been tested in about 200 patients, according to Maria Bennett, CEO of SPR Therapeutics. In a small study funded by the National Institutes of Health, the device was associated with a 72 percent reduction in pain following amputation. A prior study also found that it was better at relieving shoulder pain in a small number of patients who'd had a stroke than the usual care of physical therapy.

Another device, called the Neuro-Stim System Bridge, is being used by opioid clinics in 30 states to help people addicted to the drugs detox. The severe symptoms associated with withdrawal are a major reason why people addicted to opioids have a hard time quitting them in the first place.

The Bridge device is attached directly onto the skin behind a patient’s ear, and a battery-operated chip emits electrical pulses intended to stimulate the part of the brain involved in receiving and processing pain information.

Jeff Mathews, who runs the Union County Opiate Treatment Center in Indiana, says he’s seen “miraculous” results in patients after the clinic started using the Bridge about a year ago in a pilot program. Patients wear it for the first five days after stopping opioids. Then they're guided into counseling and further treatment.

“This could be a game changer in terms of treatment of addiction,” Mathews says. So far, the clinic has outfitted more than 100 patients with the device. He says about 85 percent of those haven’t gone back to taking opioids since using the Bridge.

[snip]

Still, while wearing these devices may not be as easy as popping a pill, their advantage is that they don’t have the same addictive side effects associated with opioid medication.

“We need to stop thinking of pain control as just being about opioid medications,” Leong says. As more new products come onto the market, he says, there’s an opportunity to treat more people using neuromodulation even before they get on opioids.


[snip][end]

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 6:33 pm 
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yah theyve now concocted new meds that are uncrushable, wont turn to powder, they use a
three letter name which i cant find in my history despite having read all about it.

ADF ADC..something like that.

anyhow, not sure how it dissolves in stomach when its uncrushable.

if theres over 100million humans in pain in this country id say medicine didnt care very well for this
huge amount of humans. but then...we were Mericans! and we could do anything, right?
we could work our asses off come home and sit in that recliner while eating plastic shit from fast food.

hoo. rah.
now the pop is fucked and being blamed for all of it.

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They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 6:37 pm 
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and yah....the best thing id want is having another qwack Dr shooting currents into my spine...just
to see what happens. hooboy, sign me up!

these machines, these zillion dollar machine technologies might help for awhile.
then they wont help anyone with long term damage which could also come from using
these fucking machines.
not saying it wont help some but it wont help most.
it is not a panacea for the overworked undercared human bodies that have been injured
in the last century, or those who live longer than 45yrs.

_________________
Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 6:50 pm 
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here theyre blaming the doctors.
every day blame shifts from Drs to pharmacies to INS back to THE PATIENTS.

there's over 350MILLION pieholes in this country yet the injured are the scapegoats for pain.

https://www.painnewsnetwork.org/stories ... pioid-news
An Epidemic of Fake Opioid News
February 16, 2017

The result of this study has been a surprising explosion of fake news about the opioid crisis. It is almost
ironic that the spread of this news looks more like an epidemic than the actual opioid crisis does.

_________________
Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


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