RadioFreeLiberal.com

Smart Voices, Be Heard
It is currently Fri Jun 22, 2018 2:54 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 111 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:05 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:07 am
Posts: 16172
central america, where this complex of humans altered the weather patterns for the Indefinite
Future, they all died off once theyd stripped the trees off their part of planet earth.
the entire area of central america both north and south of this precise location became
drought ridden for centuries. uninhabitable. gone.
once the animals die there is no food. gone.

you can have your football field sized yachts filled with spam but soon it will run out and you cant survive
the centuries it takes to grow again. only the poor will survive.

earth. its all we've got. we..nearly 8billion humans.

images
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/201 ... a-pacunam/
Exclusive: Laser Scans Reveal Maya "Megalopolis" Below Guatemalan Jungle

In what’s being hailed as a “major breakthrough” in Maya archaeology, researchers have identified the ruins of more than 60,000 houses, palaces, elevated highways, and other human-made features that have been hidden for centuries under the jungles of northern Guatemala.

The results suggest that Central America supported an advanced civilization that was, at its peak some 1,200 years ago, more comparable to sophisticated cultures such as ancient Greece or China than to the scattered and sparsely populated city states that ground-based research had long suggested.

At its peak in the Maya classic period (approximately A.D. 250–900), the civilization covered an area about twice the size of medieval England, but it was far more densely populated.

“Most people had been comfortable with population estimates of around 5 million,” said Estrada-Belli, who directs a multi-disciplinary archaeological project at Holmul, Guatemala. “With this new data it’s no longer unreasonable to think that there were 10 to 15 million people there—including many living in low-lying, swampy areas that many of us had thought uninhabitable.”

Environmental degradation is another concern. Guatemala is losing more than 10 percent of its forests annually, and habitat loss has accelerated along its border with Mexico as trespassers burn and clear land for agriculture and human settlement.

_________________
Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


Last edited by rainwater on Mon Feb 05, 2018 9:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:13 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:07 am
Posts: 16172
earth.

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/201 ... er-cities/
Why Cape Town Is Running Out of Water, and Who’s Next--
The South African city plans to shut off the taps to 4 million people. But it's just one of many cities around the world facing a future with too little water.


ten years these bears will be gone.
https://news.nationalgeographic.com/201 ... vironment/
Polar Bears Really Are Starving Because of Global Warming, Study Shows--

Because of melting sea ice, it is likely that more polar bears will soon starve, warns a new study that discovered the large carnivores need to eat 60 percent more than anyone had realized.
“Our study reveals polar bears’ utter dependence on seals,” said lead author Anthony Pagano, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).
Polar bears rely almost exclusively on a calorie-loaded diet of seals.

Disappearing Ice Makes for Hungrier Bears
Climate change is heating up the Arctic faster than anywhere else, and sea ice is shrinking 14 percent per decade. Even today, in the middle of the bitter cold Arctic winter, satellites show there is about 770,000 square miles less sea ice than the 1981 to 2010 median (That's an area larger than Alaska and California combined). In the late spring, the ice is breaking up sooner and forming later in the fall, forcing bears to burn huge amounts of energy walking or swimming long distances to get to any remaining ice. Or they stay on land longer, spending the summer and, increasingly, the fall fasting, living off their fat from the seals they caught in the spring.

_________________
Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:26 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:10 pm
Posts: 16655
Location: The blue parts of the map
I'd already posted the Mayan story in Off the Beaten Track, but now that you've put it into that context, we might as well discuss it here.

We don't know what made the Mayans decline well before the Spanish could get there and do it for them. However, with a civilization of this magnitude, deforestation can't be ruled out as a major contributor. Yes, forests grow back, but it's never the same.

My only direct experience is in California. It has certainly deforested in most places, through a variety of processes. There's been one of those ecological feedback cycles with the climate change caused by persistent high-pressure ridging, which is caused by Arctic ice melt, which has a lot of causes, one of them being global deforestation. And so it goes.

The result I'm seeing is that much of CA is evolving into something more resembling the Kalahari. Look it up. It's an arid semi-desert in southwestern Africa. Much of CA already looks like it. Our coast has been more vegetated than that, due to rain storms hitting the coastal mountain ranges. It's kind of soon to say, but right now all signs point to these storms becoming far more rare.

Don't live here. Find another place without snow.

_________________
"Words are the new bullets, satellites the new artillery"
--"Winning CNN Wars," Army War College

"One bomb was shown on TV, and the American people bought that war. War is show business."
--"Wag the Dog"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:47 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:07 am
Posts: 16172
we do know deforestation wiped them out.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science- ... -30863026/
August 2012
Why Did the Mayan Civilization Collapse? A New Study Points to Deforestation and Climate Change--
A severe drought, exacerbated by widespread logging, appears to have triggered the mysterious Mayan demise--

... went from bustling cities to abandoned ruins over the course of roughly a hundred years.

In his 2005 book Collapse, though, Jared Diamond put forth a different sort of theory—that a prolonged drought, exacerbated by ill-advised deforestation, forced Mayan populations to abandon their cities. That hypothesis has finally been put to the test with archaeological evidence and environmental data and the results published this week in a pair of studies.
...

The other study, published by researchers from Columbia University and elsewhere this week in Geophysical Research Letters, applied quantitative data to these trends. Using population records and measurements from current forested and cleared lands in the region, they constructed a computer model of deforestation in the Yucatan and ran simulations to see how this would have affected rainfall.

Because cleared land absorbs less solar radiation, less water evaporates from its surface, making clouds and rainfall more scarce. As a result, the rapid deforestation exacerbated an already severe drought—in the simulation, deforestation reduced precipitation by five to 15 percent and was responsible for 60 percent of the total drying that occurred over the course of a century as the Mayan civilization collapsed. The lack of forest cover also contributed to erosion and soil depletion. ...

_________________
Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 3:36 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:07 am
Posts: 16172
>>>I'd already posted the Mayan story in Off the Beaten Track>>>

i didnt see that zowie.
i did think after seeing natGeo that perhaps it was time for a thread on our planet anyway. :)

_________________
Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 3:48 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:07 am
Posts: 16172
im outta here for now...yall enjoy todays fun with gropergate.

what got me doing a Earth thread this morning is this:
..ive got so so so many rock stone tools im going thru for pictures and i Have to do this for the indef future.
i have a lot. i thot...i thot i could dump some until..i found info on what many (edit) More of these are and
now i, literally, cant get rid of any of them until i get a geo/anthro to see them.
i have to arrange them for photos which is gonna take weeks...to organize for pic.

manos pestles gravers scrapers adze axes to name a few.
then i have the collection from WCO to deal with.
i travel lite except im a rock hound.

_________________
Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


Last edited by rainwater on Fri Feb 02, 2018 7:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 4:45 pm 
Offline
Policy Wonk
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2011 2:31 pm
Posts: 3805
Earth...

the final frontier.

Truly.

I guess on Star Trek, Earth must have been doing fine.

_________________
Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3_8wdvTjq8


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 5:10 pm 
Offline
Policy Wonk
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2011 2:31 pm
Posts: 3805
I kind of like our planet, and plan to spend a lot of time here.

If we try to figure out a manual for the spaceship Earth, as Buckminister called it, one thing that impairs our ability is the spin on the facts. Buckminister Fuller didn't take into account the politicalization of science. Exploitation of the resources of human labor, and Earth's natural bounties take overwhelming influence of man's course. It seems to be an illusive defect in the human race. Personally, I don't think it is an aggressive nature but a survival urge, like ego, to control the environment.

Maybe, our course can avert catastrophe.

Maybe.

_________________
Image
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3_8wdvTjq8


Last edited by TheFox on Sat Feb 03, 2018 2:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 6:24 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:10 pm
Posts: 16655
Location: The blue parts of the map
If the Mayan civilization was really the size suggested by this present data, I have no problem with deforestation as a major cause of its decline.

_________________
"Words are the new bullets, satellites the new artillery"
--"Winning CNN Wars," Army War College

"One bomb was shown on TV, and the American people bought that war. War is show business."
--"Wag the Dog"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 7:14 pm 
Online
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 02, 2015 6:57 pm
Posts: 10769
Location: Sunny South Florida
Science fiction aside, and even fairly plausible movies like The Martian, too, it will be a long while before humans can survive long-term on any other planets in the solar system, and warp drives aside, we will need something like you see in Interstellar or Passengers to get outside of it. It will take a long time to reach worlds outside of our system. I mean, a really long time. At the speeds we've achieved so far, it takes 80,000 years to get to Alpha Centauri.

And that doesn't seem to have any planets (sorry, Babylon 5 fans).

Yeah, we're stuck on this planet for a while. We better figure out how to maintain human civilization on it. Electing idiots who ignore climate change is not the way.

I never pay much attention to people toting signs "Save the Earth". It will survive. So will other lifeforms. Humans, well, like Ike says, we may not make it. That's on us.

Maybe a few million years from now, the sentient bipedal cockroach humanoids who are the new apex species will be digging up our ruins, and wondering.

_________________
-- Tis an ill wind that blows no minds.
Malaclypse the Younger


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 7:25 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:07 am
Posts: 16172
Quote:
Why Did the Mayan Civilization Collapse? A New Study Points to Deforestation and Climate Change--

climate changing is a result of deforestation.

changing weather patterns are a result of deforestation.

warming weather is a result of deforestation.

perhaps the last time volcanoes changed the earth they too caused massive deforestation.

i get the impression that "trees" are key to surviving on an earth planet.
maybe not mars, but here, it sure seems conifers are key to survival.

puerto rico rain forests had huge pines. they had them, someone prolly logged them before
the hurricane took the land cover with it but they were there when i was. pines dont do heat
well but they like the rains so the island rain forest was good to them.

the pinon cedar forest im in now...was clear cut about..25-30yrs ago to the dirt. but then, the
sturdy, the tough cedars came back and in their shade the lowly pinon pines grew too.
i was shocked to see this tree dynamic. id never seen it before. all these juniper cedars across
this mountain range have partner pinon pines growing right along side them. the cedars
shaded the pinons enough to grow well and they did. there are a few swaths of ponderosa pines
not far from me which must have been some sort of EASEMENT that kept the kockbros logging OUT.
thats the only place i see them here. they look healthy, ive hugged one. the heat is hard on them tho.
they look much better thru fall and even this dry winter.

but alas, yes theres always a but. much of this pinon cedar forest is also covered in lichen moss fungal rot.
whoever said lichen was good for more than finding north side--well you cant do that anymore since
the fungus has spread Across the WEST in all the forests which show heat stressed low immune
response and thusly covered in lichen fungus that kills them.

ive got a garden area where one pinon and one cedar are particularly watered most of the year
since its a garden-ey area: they have NO lichen shit on them.
all trees nearby that dont get regular water have the fungus shit on them. as well the entire mountain.

it kills the tree about 30ft they fall over dried out dead. covered in lichen shit.
thats the stuff causing these long long forest fires...the dead fall of rotted fallen down trees.

if they just had to put the fires out in the green vegetation of the tops of any conifer forests like
the old days?....the fires would be out in days. green vegetation wont burn unless its too dry to live.

_________________
Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:49 pm 
Offline
Policy Wonk
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2016 9:37 am
Posts: 3205
Science fiction aside, and even fairly plausible movies like The Martian, too, it will be a long while before humans can survive long-term on any other planets in the solar system, and warp drives aside, we will need something like you see in Interstellar or Passengers to get outside of it. It will take a long time to reach worlds outside of our system. I mean, a really long time. At the speeds we've achieved so far, it takes 80,000 years to get to Alpha Centauri.

And that doesn't seem to have any planets (sorry, Babylon 5 fans).

Yeah, we're stuck on this planet for a while. We better figure out how to maintain human civilization on it. Electing idiots who ignore climate change is not the way.

I never pay much attention to people toting signs "Save the Earth". It will survive. So will other lifeforms. Humans, well, like Ike says, we may not make it. That's on us.

Maybe a few million years from now, the sentient bipedal cockroach humanoids who are the new apex species will be digging up our ruins, and wondering.


maybe but then again could be that all that is quite easy once its figured out and never know might stumble into it quite unexpectedly and soon.

_________________
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqbHi_jDF-I


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 10:58 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus

Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2011 10:27 pm
Posts: 7746
Location: miles from nowhere
Science fiction aside, and even fairly plausible movies like The Martian, too, it will be a long while before humans can survive long-term on any other planets in the solar system, and warp drives aside, we will need something like you see in Interstellar or Passengers to get outside of it. It will take a long time to reach worlds outside of our system. I mean, a really long time. At the speeds we've achieved so far, it takes 80,000 years to get to Alpha Centauri.

And that doesn't seem to have any planets (sorry, Babylon 5 fans).

Yeah, we're stuck on this planet for a while. We better figure out how to maintain human civilization on it. Electing idiots who ignore climate change is not the way.

I never pay much attention to people toting signs "Save the Earth". It will survive. So will other lifeforms. Humans, well, like Ike says, we may not make it. That's on us.

Maybe a few million years from now, the sentient bipedal cockroach humanoids who are the new apex species will be digging up our ruins, and wondering.

Yup, the planet will go on. For those who think technology will save us it is technology that put us in this position. I am no Luddite but like most stuff man does it has downside as well as upside. Because we can do something doesn’t mean we should.

_________________
bird's theorem-"we the people" are stupid.

"No one is so foolish as to choose war over peace. In peace sons bury their fathers, in war fathers bury their sons." - Herodotus


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:54 am 
Offline
Policy Wonk
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2016 9:37 am
Posts: 3205
www.youtube.com Video from : www.youtube.com

_________________
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqbHi_jDF-I


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 3:44 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:10 pm
Posts: 16655
Location: The blue parts of the map
Forest fires didn't used to crown as often as they do now. They'd run through the underbrush and leave most of the trees scorched but otherwise unharmed. This type of fire was actually essential to the ecology of the forest and it's one reason the Forest Service now does prescribed burns in the (ever shorter) off season.

Most of the problem is from clearcutting as opposed to thinning the forest. They insist on taking everything, leaving bare dirt. This is ecocide. Why it's still legal.... well there's that money in politics thing again.

Google Earth is illuminating on this subject. Any forested area in the US has these areas that have been recently clearcut. You see these holes everywhere. Along with the ever proliferating ski resorts, they're most of what shows from space. Like a case of zits on the Earth.

We were taught that forests grow back. They do, but it takes a lot longer than you think, and usually the first stuff to come back is non-native and ill suited to the climate. This is another reason for the stressed trees you see everywhere. It's heartening if ponderosa pines are coming back amid the other stuff, though we may be past the power curve here.

_________________
"Words are the new bullets, satellites the new artillery"
--"Winning CNN Wars," Army War College

"One bomb was shown on TV, and the American people bought that war. War is show business."
--"Wag the Dog"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 8:58 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:07 am
Posts: 16172
Quote:
We were taught that forests grow back. They do, but it takes a lot longer than you think, and usually the first stuff to come back is non-native and ill suited to the climate. This is another reason for the stressed trees you see everywhere. It's heartening if ponderosa pines are coming back amid the other stuff, though we may be past the power curve here.


well they do grow back, or, they did grow back for a long time they grew back.
the interference in this process was man. man who then grazed and plowed the same earth, land,
which made quick use of any seedlings growing back the last 200years.

over this last century it got worse since the heat set in. until the recent..25+years, since they began
clear cutting in serious degrees down to the dirt...that altered all processes seen as "normal".
the secondary succession weeds and infiltrating blown in seed from who knows where took over
in a few weeks to a season thus crowding out any conifer seedlings creating the mess you see
in OR now; thick congested lichen fungal webbed hillsides full of dying trees both pine and scrub oak.
thats an impossible situation to rectify.
i drove some logging roads up near the dam and thot for sure i was in some horror movie, the
thick web congestion in small valleys was choking. its shocking.

i dont recall seeing Any conifers growing back Anywhere in SOR. one hillside..maybe a few that
really didnt stand a chance.

its too hot for them now. we wont see many new ponderosa's return at this point.
pinons and cedar junipers are hanging on but falling over all the time too. the land is so dry
they dont seem to have much root system left.

its like a circle loop...remove the water the drought kill the trees which brings more drought
which brings less rain and round n round.
there was a tipping point but its long passed. warnings rang out from the 50's forward and
no one on wallst GAF.

_________________
Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 10:29 pm 
Offline
Policy Wonk
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2016 9:37 am
Posts: 3205
thought these were interesting.

Meteor Dust May Affect the Weather, Study Says

Quote:
...........In a recent issue of the journal Nature, the team counters one widely held belief: that meteors that vaporize in our atmosphere leave behind particles far too tiny and dispersed to affect the weather.

The researchers say the new lidar readings show otherwise; meteors can leave tons of debris composed of particles at least a micron (one millionth of a meter) across—a diameter big enough to form the heart of raindrops.

The finding means that a strike by a 33-foot (10-meter) meteor could cause minor weather disturbances anywhere winds carry its debris—including the far side of the Earth. (Meteors of that size hit our atmosphere only once a decade, on average.)

ReVelle, the Los Alamos researcher, notes that debris from such a meteor would rain down from the stratosphere and thus could seed clouds.

The scientist notes that meteors won't cause cataclysmic changes in Earth's atmosphere. The total amount of asteroid dust that enters Earth's atmosphere in a year is a small fraction of the total human-made pollutants pumped out in a day.

Ozone Protection

But the finding does offer a new perspective on how sensitive our atmosphere is.

For instance, a meteor that hits the Earth near the Equator could cause more significant weather effects. Because the sun's energy strikes our planet most directly the Equator, the solar radiation would violently stir any meteor debris deposited there.

The study also suggests that researchers may need to reevaluate the impact of volcanic activity. Volcanoes are capable of jettisoning many thousands of tons of debris into the stratosphere—much more than a meteor and with significantly more energy.

ReVelle spotlights another finding, one that has yet to be published: The team's readings show that the Antarctic meteor may have caused a significant disturbance in the ozone layer.

Scientists thought the protective atmospheric layer in the stratosphere was more impervious to such intruders. The finding, though, suggests the UV-resistant layer may not be as firm a protective coating as believed.

"If you knew about everything that enters our atmosphere every day, you probably wouldn't sleep at night," ReVelle said.



Did a meteorite cause a brush fire in Bowie? Definitely not, and here’s why.

Quote:
........“First off, meteorites don’t start forest fires,” Hankey told The Washington Post. “A meteor explodes so high up the atmosphere that it’s cold when it hits the ground.”

For example, the meteorite that blasted into Chelyabinsk, Russia, in Februaru 2013 — causing nearly 1,500 injuries and damaging thousands of buildings — was the “size of a house,” but it would not have started any fires. Meteors aren’t even “on fire” as they shoot across the sky; it’s actually the air around the meteoroid that becomes superheated, which causes the space rock to shed debris, which is what creates the glowing streak across the sky.

And, Hankey said, “something that would create a crater like this would be too huge to go unnoticed. There would be an echoing boom. The forest would be blown down and the trees would be knocked over, but there’s no explosive fire.”.............


superheated air, where some of our wind energy comes from

_________________
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqbHi_jDF-I


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:25 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus

Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:45 am
Posts: 6207
North Carolina governor seeks offshore drilling exemption in Zinke meeting

Roy Cooper: ‘No safe method to drill for oil and gas off the coast’
Interior secretary had exempted Republican-controlled Florida


North Carolina’s governor said he had a good conversation on Saturday with the interior secretary, Ryan Zinke, regarding plans to expand drilling for gas and oil off the state’s coast.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/201 ... ke-meeting


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 4:00 am 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2013 3:07 am
Posts: 9885
North Carolina governor seeks offshore drilling exemption in Zinke meeting

Roy Cooper: ‘No safe method to drill for oil and gas off the coast’
Interior secretary had exempted Republican-controlled Florida


North Carolina’s governor said he had a good conversation on Saturday with the interior secretary, Ryan Zinke, regarding plans to expand drilling for gas and oil off the state’s coast.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/201 ... ke-meeting


There's no oil there. At least not enough oil to produce. This is another fake Trumpet. :|

I looked it up. Since 1925, 129 exploratory wells have been drilled in the North Carolina coastal area. 116 were dry holes, 2 were mechanical failures and had to be plugged. 11 did show some oil and gas but were abandoned due to there not being enough of a show to warrant production.

A little bit of exploratory drilling was also done off the coast of New Jersey, which was abandon when it was found to not be economical, and that was during a time when prices were better than they are now.

Five wells were also drilled off of Florida, they weren't produced because they weren't considered to be economical. There wasn't enough oil.

No oil or gas has ever been produced from the U.S. Atlantic continental shelf. No one is clamoring to drill there.




There's oil off of Cuba. :|


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 8:36 am 
Offline
Board Emeritus

Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2011 10:27 pm
Posts: 7746
Location: miles from nowhere

There's no oil there. At least not enough oil to produce. This is another fake Trumpet. :|

I looked it up. Since 1925, 129 exploratory wells have been drilled in the North Carolina coastal area. 116 were dry holes, 2 were mechanical failures and had to be plugged. 11 did show some oil and gas but were abandoned due to there not being enough of a show to warrant production.

A little bit of exploratory drilling was also done off the coast of New Jersey, which was abandon when it was found to not be economical, and that was during a time when prices were better than they are now.

Five wells were also drilled off of Florida, they weren't produced because they weren't considered to be economical. There wasn't enough oil.

No oil or gas has ever been produced from the U.S. Atlantic continental shelf. No one kis clamoring to drill there.




There's oil off of Cuba. :|

Doesn’t matter if there is or not. If the Republican Party wants to drill, baby, drill then there should be no exemptions particularly from Republican governors. They want to despoil the environment then they are included in the despoiling.

_________________
bird's theorem-"we the people" are stupid.

"No one is so foolish as to choose war over peace. In peace sons bury their fathers, in war fathers bury their sons." - Herodotus


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 10:08 am 
Offline
Board Emeritus

Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2012 11:01 pm
Posts: 15263
The earth will be on it's way to a full recovery when climate change, pandemic, apocalypse and the subsequent disappearance of the scourge of locusts that constitutes the "human" race (and I use the term human loosely) is finally successful in offing itself.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 7:58 pm 
Offline
Policy Wonk
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2016 9:37 am
Posts: 3205
NASA's new guardian of the galaxy? An Indiana University professor

Quote:
NASA has hired a Hoosier astrobiologist to protect planet Earth from microscopic threats.

Lisa Pratt, Provost Professor in the Indiana University Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, has been named the planetary protection officer at NASA.

That means Pratt is responsible for protecting Earth from potential contamination by extraterrestrial life forms, including potential microorganisms that could live in the ice or groundwater of Mars.

Pratt will also work to make sure that Earth's microbes don't accidentally make to other planets through exploratory probes, or the boots of astronauts embarking on their next mission............

_________________
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqbHi_jDF-I


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2018 1:10 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:07 am
Posts: 16172
they write 'toward the end of the ice age'....which ice age?...the really big one or the numerous
smaller ones which left us around 1850: they are not clear on this.

inetresting to know pines grew BeFore the comets arrived. for that matter so did deciduous poplars.

https://www.rawstory.com/2018/02/massiv ... chers-say/
Massive comet led to a mini ice age: researchers say---

Toward the end of the ice age, a massive firestorm broke out after fragments of a comet that measured more than 60 miles wide, struck the planet. Dust clouds created from the fire went on to cover the Earth leading to a mini ice age, according to an international team of scientists.

“A number of different chemical signatures—carbon dioxide, nitrate, ammonia and others—all seem to indicate
that an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth's land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers, was
consumed by fires.”


In addition to rocks and glaciers, the team also examined pollen. The pollen levels they saw led them to believe that the fire burned off acres of pine forests, which were later replaced with poplar trees that colonized the open land.
acres?...id suspect it was the "10 percent...land surface" "consumed by fires" that wiped out the pines.

_________________
Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2018 1:23 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2013 3:07 am
Posts: 9885
Doesn’t matter if there is or not. If the Republican Party wants to drill, baby, drill then there should be no exemptions particularly from Republican governors. They want to despoil the environment then they are included in the despoiling.


I wasn't addressing that imaginary political facet of this issue Bird. I was addressing if there is actually any real threat to the environment.

If there's not enough oil there to economically support drilling there, there will not be any off shore drilling there.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Earth
PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:20 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus

Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2011 10:27 pm
Posts: 7746
Location: miles from nowhere

I wasn't addressing that imaginary political facet of this issue Bird. I was addressing if there is actually any real threat to the environment.

If there's not enough oil there to economically support drilling there, there will not be any off shore drilling there.

I get it regarding the viability of a well. No oil, no completion. I am simply annoyed that this asshat Republican is having a case of the NIMBY’s when Republicans want full steam ahead other places. If oil companies want to drill in this governor’s offshore areas to determine viability too damn bad.

_________________
bird's theorem-"we the people" are stupid.

"No one is so foolish as to choose war over peace. In peace sons bury their fathers, in war fathers bury their sons." - Herodotus


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 111 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: ProfessorX and 14 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group