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PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2019 6:37 pm 
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Huh. I start looking into it, and the contradictions emerge already. By the way, no I'm not going to put this in Media, it's current events.

Why Is a Music Genre Called 'Americana' So Overwhelmingly White and Male?
The genre seeks to represent and celebrate a national identity, but in the process, it erases the history and diversity of its influences.
https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainme ... le/278267/

Case in point: The nonprofit Americana Music Association formed in 1999, and held its first festival and conference the following year in Nashville. The big coup came in 2009, when the Grammy Foundation established an independent category for Best Americana Album. In the four years since, no musician under 60 has won the award.

And despite the genre's roots in gospel and the blues, the 20 Americana nominees to date have included only one black artist: the singer Mavis Staples, who won the award in 2011 for You Are Not Alone. (The album was produced by Wilco's Jeff Tweedy.)

Americana's proponents position themselves as anti-establishment gadflies to the left of commercial country. Many see themselves as preserving some bygone, purer strand of Americanness, and argue -- in distinctly rockist terms -- that this genre is just the modern-day manifestation of a timeless truth. (CBC radio personality Madonna Hamel gave a digestible synopsis in a recent radio special on Americana: The Americana Music Association, she said, is a brotherhood of "ex-industry types [who] quit their lucrative day jobs to get exposure for the artists they love. Their goal was simple: find a home for singers who can sing, writers who can write, players who can play.")

[snip]

In her book It Still Moves, a loving depiction of Americana's roots, Amanda Petrusich gets it right: "It sometimes seems like the Delta's legacy is most present in modern hip-hop" -- rather than Americana -- "where its basic tenets are still being perpetuated, even if the form has altered dramatically."

[snip]

By implying that bands like Dawes encompass some omni-American ideal, the Americana genre doesn't just reify the notion that a white male perspective defines the American experience. It runs the risk of confusing oldness with authenticity. The music looks to conjure an America before big-box stores, when commerce was still a community-based ritual, when a fistfight and a beer were enough to settle a debt. This is all a sort of mythmaking, which is fine: That's part of what music is for. But as Oscar Wilde expressed, art is useful because it invites life to imitate it; what separates the two also holds them together. Music gets its power from a keen, contemporary perspective, not from reviving someone else's memories. America, like its many musical forms, is becoming more diverse, so it feels facile to let this one strain of yellow-page nostalgia represent it.

[snip][end]

Inside the Americana Genre’s Identity Crisis
As the burgeoning musical format kicks off its 18th AmericanaFest, some question if the community is as inclusive as it should be
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/musi ... is-202818/

Yet it takes only a few minutes of conversation for Cash to bring up what she sees as the community’s greatest shortcoming.

“The Americana community needs to embrace more black musicians,” she says, unprompted. “That’s the one area where I feel it should really strive to be even more inclusive. I, for one, wouldn’t be doing what I’m doing if there wasn’t some black musician who had suffered in the South. That needs to be honored, and if amends need to be made, they need to be made.

“If the Milk Carton Kids and Van Morrison and William Bell can co-exist under the same umbrella,” Cash continues, “then I think that some deeper blues artists could come under that umbrella as well.”

While the upper tiers of the Americana format have become a haven for roots-leaning artists of color of different generations – encompassing blues singer Keb’ Mo’, soul legend Mavis Staples, roots revivalist Rhiannon Giddens, the Mavericks frontman Raul Malo, and singer-songwriter Alejandro Escovedo – the demographic makeup of this year’s AmericanaFest puts the community’s representational dynamics in stark relief. A cursory search of the festival’s lineup points to a startling disparity: of the roughly 300 artists listed in this year’s AmericanaFest roster, more than 90 percent of the acts are made up of exclusively white performers.

[snip][end]

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2019 10:33 pm 
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Why Is a Music Genre Called 'Americana' So Overwhelmingly White and Male?

...

Inside the Americana Genre’s Identity Crisis
As the burgeoning musical format kicks off its 18th AmericanaFest, some question if the community is as inclusive as it should be
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/musi ... is-202818/

Yet it takes only a few minutes of conversation for Cash to bring up what she sees as the community’s greatest shortcoming.

“The Americana community needs to embrace more black musicians,” she says, unprompted. “That’s the one area where I feel it should really strive to be even more inclusive. I, for one, wouldn’t be doing what I’m doing if there wasn’t some black musician who had suffered in the South. That needs to be honored, and if amends need to be made, they need to be made.

“If the Milk Carton Kids and Van Morrison and William Bell can co-exist under the same umbrella,” Cash continues, “then I think that some deeper blues artists could come under that umbrella as well.”

While the upper tiers of the Americana format have become a haven for roots-leaning artists of color of different generations – encompassing blues singer Keb’ Mo’, soul legend Mavis Staples, roots revivalist Rhiannon Giddens, the Mavericks frontman Raul Malo, and singer-songwriter Alejandro Escovedo – the demographic makeup of this year’s AmericanaFest puts the community’s representational dynamics in stark relief. A cursory search of the festival’s lineup points to a startling disparity: of the roughly 300 artists listed in this year’s AmericanaFest roster, more than 90 percent of the acts are made up of exclusively white performers.

[snip][end]


Sounds like another one of those Columbus genres formed exactly 1- in opposition to African Americans and 2- the inclusion of African-American artforms in so-called roots music.

Think Dixieland (white, enter through the front door) vs Jazz (Black, Latino, enter through the side door.)

They do this with every genre.

Related:

Gay Black Men Helped Create EDM. Why Do Straight White Men Dominate It? - Billboard

Quote:
It was 1975, and the club at 555 W. Adams St. and local venues like it were sonic and social revelations. By year’s end, the venue had moved to a members-only space nearby that was officially named US Studio, but was called “The Warehouse” by attendees. Revelers shortened that name to “house” to describe the music DJs like Frankie Knuckles -- who would come to be known as the godfather of the genre -- played there, grafting gospel and soul vocals over kick drums made with the era’s emerging drum machine technology and played at 120-130 beats per minute. With a thrilling soundtrack, the gay men populating the dancefloor could freely express themselves.

“Being ostracized as black, gay kids,” says Dunson, founder/president of the Frankie Knuckles Foundation, which works to preserve Knuckles’ legacy and support his causes, “this felt like a place where we could be who we were while being protected from the judgments of society.”

“Chicago was kind of a racist town,”


kind of

Quote:
adds Warehouse founder Robert Williams, who relocated to the Midwest from New York in the early ’70s. He recruited Knuckles to be the resident DJ at his new club. The Warehouse “was a haven for the gay community, which also turned into the heterosexual community, because the gay kids were inviting their heterosexual friends who were dying to come in.”

From Knuckles and company in Chicago to fellow house innovators David Mancuso and Larry Levan in New York, dance music’s roots in the gay club scenes of the late ’70s and early ’80s are well documented. Gay men, and particularly gay men of color, are widely credited with creating house music and planting the seeds of the many genres that have evolved from it.

Walk into a Las Vegas club today, and you’ll hear music -- mainly, what’s known as EDM -- that draws on this earlier sound. Like the blues and other genres before it, it is music forged by a marginalized community that is now dominated by the heteronormative mainstream, with straight, white, cisgender men populating label boardrooms and festival lineups. While underground LGBTQ-oriented clubs continue trendsetting in major cities, in the most visible and lucrative incarnations of the scene they created, gay and black artists are in the minority.

...

Meanwhile, gay club culture continues evolving in (and out of) the underground.


Yeah, more often than not, for self-protection.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2019 10:46 pm 
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So, ever since Ike told me about Americana music ... this is the most interesting thing I've discovered.

It's so appropriately named ... it is so "American" ... made up of roots that hide their roots. :D

Looks to me like an attempt by the Nashville country music industry to win back liberals, non-WASPs, and others that gave up on country in the Aughts ... mostly by (on the sly) continuing a lot of the same crap that made them leave. Reminds me of "indie" rock that once you start probing ... is really just the same old Top 40 from the same giant corporate rock labels, but slyly presented as something different.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 19, 2019 11:54 pm 
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So, ever since Ike told me about Americana music ... this is the most interesting thing I've discovered.

It's so appropriately named ... it is so "American" ... made up of roots that hide their roots. :D


Haha, classic.

And true to form, they think nobody else around them can see those roots for exactly what they are.

Quote:
Looks to me like an attempt by the Nashville country music industry to win back liberals, non-WASPs, and others that gave up on country in the Aughts ... mostly by (on the sly) continuing a lot of the same crap that made them leave. Reminds me of "indie" rock that once you start probing ... is really just the same old Top 40 from the same giant corporate rock labels, but slyly presented as something different.


Led Zeppelin is just Delta Blues put through Fenders and Marshalls.

Lol we used to have a joke that no wonder Adorno was all freaked out about "jazz". He saw King of Jazz (1930)* and got the idea that that had much remotely to do with actual jazz. :lol:

I almost posted this in the country thread, but it fits even better here.

www.youtube.com Video from : www.youtube.com



The King of Jazz presentation of "jazz" was the liberal view of jazz exemplified by the Gershwins, Bing Crosby, Paul Whiteman, etc. with nary a Black jazz artist around for miles. $o, when white$ do it, it become$ intere$ting, fun, and $omething of cultural value. But they'd already been at this for 100 years.


*this is actually one of my favorite pre-code, early talkie movies

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I've never said this about glen accurately pointing out your racism before, and I defy you to post a link to any post where I have.

With this race baiting comment outta carmen, I feel I owe the guy [glen] an apology.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 9:17 am 
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So, ever since Ike told me about Americana music ... this is the most interesting thing I've discovered.

It's so appropriately named ... it is so "American" ... made up of roots that hide their roots. :D

Looks to me like an attempt by the Nashville country music industry to win back liberals, non-WASPs, and others that gave up on country in the Aughts ... mostly by (on the sly) continuing a lot of the same crap that made them leave. Reminds me of "indie" rock that once you start probing ... is really just the same old Top 40 from the same giant corporate rock labels, but slyly presented as something different.


Nice summary. Accusatory ("just the same old/slyly, etc. " eh perfesser?)...but as is your skill, very nice summary, indeed. There are times when I feel like you guys would figure out a way to politicize a pleasant little wet dream. Goddamn alt-right con was probably having a violent sexual fantasy during that self-centered wet dream, eh?

PS - one of the most popular performers and one of the most revered by the community is Richard Thomson. He is English and white, of course, which is not his fault.

Here's Richard Thompson performing his signature piece at the 2012 Americana Awards at the Ryman. It's spectacular...

www.youtube.com Video from : www.youtube.com


Maybe some of us can de-politicize ourselves for five minutes and just enjoy it...maybe not. I'm going to focus on enjoying the quality of the performances and the opportunity for the performers, who would have never had the chance under the thumb of the modern day Nashville power players of country music. Want to target somebody who deserves it? Target them, not the Americana or indie rock people.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 9:34 am 
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There are times when I feel like you would figure out a way to politicize a pleasant little wet dream.


Yeah. Well, you told me about a genre of music that I was unfamiliar with (admittedly) (yes I really don't know everything) ... did the first thing I would do if somebody told me about a new chicken sandwich or flavor of ice cream.... see what other people are saying about it.

Can't help it if these things came up first ... they did.

If you don't like things being politicized, maybe you should get off a political discussion forum? It's one place I think one expects political aspects of stuff to be analyzed. Now you're going to say art is apolitical, but come on homey, you know that was never true when the protest singers of the 60s took on the Vietnam War. We know they did, and we know they helped end it.

Was that the good or bad kind of politicizing music? Can we be honest and say part of what made Dylan popular was not just the quality of his performance, but what he was singing ABOUT?

You folks in the the Sixties came up with the slogan "the personal is political". (I wasn't born yet.) Didn't you mean it?

Quote:
Target them, not the Americana or indie rock people.


While I agree in theory, the problem is in practice it doesn't appear Americana is out of their power nexus after all.

It kinda reminds me of when discussing vaping, people sometimes screech, "it's just Big Tobacco trying to shut down their competition!" Uhhhhhh. Altria Corporation owns Juul, one of the largest e-cig makers, those are the same folks who own Marlboro.

How independent is Americana from Nashville and the "industry"? According to some, not so much as people think. But yeah ... as I said, this is also sometimes true of "indie rock" and "indie films" too. Major studios often own a division that supposedly puts out "indies" but it's still answering to the same execs at the top. Nothing new.

P.S. one last thing. I personally don't think arguments over representation in art and music are so much political, as they are cultural. They are also part of what you call "culture wars". Some people prefer to ignore the struggles in the culture for representation, others pay attention. I know that gets called "identity politics," but I really don't think it's only being waged in the political realm.

So it goes. Can't make other people like what we like, and I also know you can't make them care about what you do.

Personally, I hope Margo Price goes far. Whatever she wants to call the music she makes.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 9:53 am 
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Yeah well, personally I hope every talented musician goes as far as his or her, them or they, skill allows. I've known a number of people (including the blonde's brother) who perform with all, if not more of, the creativity, virtuosity, and technical skill of any of the successful musical performers who have net worths of hundreds of millions of dollars, and still have to keep the day job on the loading dock. These people have taught me personally that there are millions of us as good or better than the stars, who do it for reasons of considerably higher purpose than the money.

But what fun is recognizing that when we can experience the relief of taking a piss on Americana Music. And as far as "arguments over representation in art and music are so much political, as they are cultural"...everything is this joint ends up being more political than anything else. But we knew that when we signed up, eh?

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 10:02 am 
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There's people in my family who tried to make it as a living, Ike. Someone in my stepfamily tried out a musical career. I have one of his CDs. Now, look, once again, I don't pretend to be the world's best music critic. All I know is he certainly seemed to me that he had talent, and passion. I would call his efforts "alternative rock". I'd say what he called his band, but in theory that could jeopardize my secret identity.

All I know is to all the record labels he auditioned before, he lacked ... something. Didn't seem to fit with the latest Disney-backed boy bands? Who knows? He's doing something else now. Again, from what I heard, I sure wish he could have stuck with it.

I certainly hear what you're saying there. The entertainment world is cruel that way. I definitely agree with you the biggest stars are neither often offering the best performances, or even also singing about the most important, relevant stuff. And that's before we get into issues of ... the communities they represent.

BTW, when it comes to Americana, I wasn't "pissing" on the artists, I was "pissing" on the management. They are the ones making those calls and shots - who gets heard, promoted, played. As a lefty, I usually have more issues with the management than the laboring classes, and that includes music.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 10:39 am 
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Never heard of "Americana Music"...but I have never heard of lots of things.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:33 pm 
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P.S. one last thing. I personally don't think arguments over representation in art and music are so much political, as they are cultural. They are also part of what you call "culture wars". Some people prefer to ignore the struggles in the culture for representation, others pay attention. I know that gets called "identity politics," but I really don't think it's only being waged in the political realm.


Oh my goodness!! somebody on a political message board is talking about politics!?!?!

American entertainment has always had political/politicized elements but sometimes it works like this: one form shows up as talking about it, having an interest in how it works. Another form is not talking about it. Yet another form is grousing about others who enjoy talking about how it works.

Those tired old gripes about so-called identity politics use the same language as gripes about so-called political correctness, because they're the same exact gripe, typically out of the same culture. And much like when Berniebros bellyache about identity politics not realizing that monikers like "white working class" and "class first" is identity politcs, overwhelmingly white genres in a country with a history of white supremacy is also identity politics. These genres themselves are still products of a music industtry that came about in the Jim Crow era, which made it politically and also legally impossible on a practical level for artists to play or at least travel the country together as equals regardless of race, for instance.

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I've never said this about glen accurately pointing out your racism before, and I defy you to post a link to any post where I have.

With this race baiting comment outta carmen, I feel I owe the guy [glen] an apology.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:35 pm 
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There is NO RACIAL bias or otherwise anywhere in the entertainment world.

Sure, there are 5 late night shows and ALL FIVE are hosted by a WHITE STR8T MALE, but that is a coinkeydink

sigh

silly people, bias in America? silly

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"Corporate Democrat" phrase created at the same place "Angry Mob" was...People keep falling for rightwing talking points. How sad.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:38 pm 
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BTW, when it comes to Americana, I wasn't "pissing" on the artists, I was "pissing" on the management. They are the ones making those calls and shots - who gets heard, promoted, played.


Well, you weren't pissing on anything. The same critiques that you posted are a common refrain in American entertainment history and the reason genre and commercial genres make any sense at all is due to politics within culture(s). Culture vs politics is a false dilemma.

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I've never said this about glen accurately pointing out your racism before, and I defy you to post a link to any post where I have.

With this race baiting comment outta carmen, I feel I owe the guy [glen] an apology.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:45 pm 
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Yeah well, personally I hope every talented musician goes as far as his or her, them or they, skill allows.


Including, say, rap musicians or electronica musicians?

Quote:
I've known a number of people (including the blonde's brother) who perform with all, if not more of, the creativity, virtuosity, and technical skill of any of the successful musical performers who have net worths of hundreds of millions of dollars, and still have to keep the day job on the loading dock. These people have taught me personally that there are millions of us as good or better than the stars, who do it for reasons of considerably higher purpose than the money.


You've just described all of my musician friends, as well as myself at various times. It's common to all genres. It's why the music industry will always be a step behind the genres it codifies in order to make bank.

Quote:
But what fun is recognizing that when we can experience the relief of taking a piss on Americana Music.


Well, it's fun to recognize both. There's also a whole lot more to recognize.

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I've never said this about glen accurately pointing out your racism before, and I defy you to post a link to any post where I have.

With this race baiting comment outta carmen, I feel I owe the guy [glen] an apology.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:47 pm 
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There's people in my family who tried to make it as a living, Ike. Someone in my stepfamily tried out a musical career. I have one of his CDs. Now, look, once again, I don't pretend to be the world's best music critic. All I know is he certainly seemed to me that he had talent, and passion. I would call his efforts "alternative rock". I'd say what he called his band, but in theory that could jeopardize my secret identity.

All I know is to all the record labels he auditioned before, he lacked ... something. Didn't seem to fit with the latest Disney-backed boy bands? Who knows? He's doing something else now. Again, from what I heard, I sure wish he could have stuck with it.

I certainly hear what you're saying there. The entertainment world is cruel that way. I definitely agree with you the biggest stars are neither often offering the best performances, or even also singing about the most important, relevant stuff. And that's before we get into issues of ... the communities they represent.

BTW, when it comes to Americana, I wasn't "pissing" on the artists, I was "pissing" on the management. They are the ones making those calls and shots - who gets heard, promoted, played. As a lefty, I usually have more issues with the management than the laboring classes, and that includes music.


Who said you were pissing on the artists? But why you pissing on anybody? So the usual suspects are grousing that there aren't enough minority Americana artists. Lemme ask you a question. When was the last time a car being driven by a black person under the age of uh...I dunno...50, pulled up next to you and coming out of that car you could hear Mavis Staples singing her ass off? When was the last time you could hear anybody singing their ass off. When was the last time you could hear anything but deafening bottom annoying the shit out of everybody within two square blocks.
6th
You have decided to make Mavis the token black artist in Americana. Good...fine, its Mavis. Here's a suggestion...go up to a black person under the age of 50 and mention Mavis Staples and they look at you like you're the alien.

Mavis...???

Yeah Mavis...lots of us think she's the best of all time. Even better that Aretha.

Urethra??? Who's Urethra?

Seems to me that's the primary reason that there aren't more black artists involved in the Americana genre.

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Last edited by Ike Bana on Fri Sep 20, 2019 3:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:48 pm 
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There is NO RACIAL bias or otherwise anywhere in the entertainment world.


Yes! Because there never was!

Quote:
Sure, there are 5 late night shows and ALL FIVE are hosted by a WHITE STR8T MALE, but that is a coinkeydink

sigh

silly people, bias in America? silly


Sounds like an agenda-driven sub-community.

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I've never said this about glen accurately pointing out your racism before, and I defy you to post a link to any post where I have.

With this race baiting comment outta carmen, I feel I owe the guy [glen] an apology.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 2:00 pm 
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When was the last time a car being driven by a black person under the age of uh...I dunno...50, pulled up next to you and coming out of that car you could hear Mavis Staples singing her ass off? When was the last time you could hear anybody singing their ass off.


:? I guess you're not on Spotify?

Quote:
When was the last time you could hear anything but deafening bottom annoying the shit out of everybody within two square blocks.

Here's a suggestion...go up to a black person under the age of 50 and mention Mavis Staples and they look at you like you're the alien.


Lol! when's the last time you did it?

When's the last time you asked a non-Black person under the age of 50 about Mavis Staples?

What were the results?

Quote:
Mavis...???

Yeah Mavis...lots of us think she's the best of all time. Even better that Aretha.

Urethra??? Who's Urethra?

Seems to me that's the primary reason that there aren't more black artists involved in the Americana genre.


Uh-huh. If only Black parents would turn on the record player at night. :problem:

These politicized, stereotyped, caricatured resentments about Black young people and perceptions about what they listen to go back to the invention of recorded music itself and the moment it occurred to $omeone they could rake in big buck$s from $elling it. Yours is not only race-based, it's generational, and it's got a really specific history. Tricky thing about that is: what Black youth listen to today will be used to sell products 10 years from now. It's never failed in the history of the American music industry and American commercialism. That's the root of the resentment.

(Pro tip: don't ask any of my friends of any "race" under 50 about Mavis Stapled. The answers from a couple people I'm thinking of in particular will be like asking Ronald Reagan what time it is...)

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I've never said this about glen accurately pointing out your racism before, and I defy you to post a link to any post where I have.

With this race baiting comment outta carmen, I feel I owe the guy [glen] an apology.


Last edited by carmenjonze on Fri Sep 20, 2019 2:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 2:03 pm 
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Lol! when's the last time you did it?

When's the last time you asked a non-Black person under the age of 50 about Mavis Staples?

What were the results?



Uh-huh. If only Black parents would turn on the record player at night. :problem:

These politicized, stereotyped, caricatured resentments about Black young people and perceptions about what they listen to go back to the invention of recorded music itself. Yours is not only race-based, it's generational, and it's got a really specific history. Tricky thing about that is: what Black youth listen to today will be used to sell products 10 years from now. It's never failed in the history of the American music industry and American commercialism. That's the root of the resentment.

(Pro tip: don't ask any of my friends of any "race" under 50 about Mavis Stapled. The answers from a couple people I'm thinking of in particular will be like asking Ronald Reagan what time it is...)



Texas Southern isnt having Joe either

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/20/us/p ... e=Homepage


Quote:
Young Black Voters to Their Biden-Supporting Parents: ‘Is This Your King?’
An organic effort by black millennials and Gen Z-ers to influence older family members against Mr. Biden may be important in the Democratic primary.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 2:11 pm 
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www.youtube.com Video from : www.youtube.com


Maybe some of us can de-politicize ourselves for five minutes and just enjoy it...maybe not.


Each person listens to and enjoys music in their own ways. You might also consider that those of us you see as "politicized" are capable of enjoying musical performances in ways that vary from your own.

But if by "de-politicize" you mean stop talking about subjects on a political messageboard that either make you personally uncomfortable or that you're unfamiliar with, well you already know that likelihood of that.

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I've never said this about glen accurately pointing out your racism before, and I defy you to post a link to any post where I have.

With this race baiting comment outta carmen, I feel I owe the guy [glen] an apology.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 2:24 pm 
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Texas Southern isnt having Joe either

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/20/us/p ... e=Homepage




Well, it's still really early. But as this article underscores, this is a generational issue, too. Astead Herndon is an interesting writer with a really interesting beat. Lol people like Ike Bana who apparently get antsy about some types of "politicizing" music and genre isn't gonna like this very much, but...

What Do Rally Playlists Say About the Candidates?

Quote:
Presidential campaigns have a sound. We analyzed the playlists of 10 contenders to see how the songs aligned with the messages.

Song playlists at campaign rallies tell you a lot about presidential candidates. The music is selected to reflect their values, their political messages, their “real” selves. The songs also say something about the candidates’ target audiences — whether they’re young or old, straight or L.G.B.T.Q., into country, disco or hip-hop.

The music booms as people enter the rallies, and then candidates take the stage to a “walk-up” song that can become associated with their platforms. The New York Times analyzed playlists used by nine Democratic candidates and President Trump to see how they help set the tone for each campaign.


For some people, like me, some of the "enjoyment" in listening comes from analysis...you can't be a DJ or musical director or even lowly spotify playlist-maker for a politician, without it. As a musician, you might experience this too, dunno.

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I've never said this about glen accurately pointing out your racism before, and I defy you to post a link to any post where I have.

With this race baiting comment outta carmen, I feel I owe the guy [glen] an apology.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 2:31 pm 
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But why you pissing on anybody?


Because I know, personally, the feeling of exclusion ... ya know, that "hating Jews" stuff you sometimes talk about, and I know, through the experience of others I know, the feeling of exclusion from the music "industry"/"biz". So I think I can get what Margo Price and Roxanne Cash feel.

I think back on Jews that tried to make it in Hollywood and what they had to do ... usually by changing their names, getting nose jobs, and WASPifying themselves. That's how "Bernard Schwartz" became "Stony Curtis" to make a career in movies.

What a world, if people could be who they are, and perform for the world, and make a decent living at it. That they can't ... yeah, it definitely pisses, me off.

Quote:
So the usual suspects are grousing that there aren't enough minority Americana artists. Lemme ask you a question.


Gonna ask you one back. Does your "theory" here also work for LatinX under-representation in Americana? If not ...

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 2:51 pm 
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Gonna ask you one back. Does your "theory" here also work for LatinX under-representation in Americana? If not ...


Ha, was just going to ask the same thing!

Before answering, Ike Bana might want to consider the recent news that almost half of Spotify's global most-streamed songs were by Latinx artists, the bulk of those being Latin Trap.

Almost Half of Spotify’s Most Streamed Global Songs This Summer Were by Latino Artists

Quote:
Sech and Darrell’s “Otro Trago” isn’t one of those. The club banger took the seventh spot in Spotify’s newly released list of most-streamed songs of the summer globally. (The 20-item list, btw, is made up of nearly half Latinx/Latin American artists.) Two months ago, music editor Eduardo Cepeda wrote that the song “features the kind of undeniably catchy chorus that will stay in your head for weeks. And with an upcoming (and much-teased) posse remix featuring just about every big name in urbano, this has a real chance of ruling the summer.” His prediction, as evidenced by charts and DJ sets around the world, was correct.

“Callaita” comes in fifth, directly following Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Road” remix with Billy Ray Cyrus. The somehow crude yet dulcet reggaeton bop was made with beach days in mind, and it comes as no surprise that this Tainy and Bad Bunny collab played backdrop to your summer nights. The lingering Mas Flow, “Alócate” sample at the end of that track often plays in the back of my mind for days. Then, of course, there’s Daddy Yankee and Snow’s “Con Calma,” which came in at No. 15.

Other notables include Lunay’s “Soltera” remix, the perhaps out of left field “Loco Contigo” which features J Balvin, plus Shawn Mendes and Camila Cabello’s sticky “Señorita” which came in at No. 1 globally, and second in the states. It’s worth noting, though, that the last day of summer in our neck of the woods isn’t until the end of September, leaving ample time for brewing projects and singles to oust some of your favorites from their current comfortable positions.


Songs of the Summer (top 20) - Spotify

There's also a ton of Americana on Spotify, made by Spotify and others.

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I've never said this about glen accurately pointing out your racism before, and I defy you to post a link to any post where I have.

With this race baiting comment outta carmen, I feel I owe the guy [glen] an apology.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 3:17 pm 
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[quote="[url=http://radiofreeliberal.com/viewtopic.php?p=458592#p458592]ProfessorX » Fri Sep 20, 2019 1:31 pm[/url]"]

Gonna ask you one back. Does your "theory" here also work for LatinX under-representation in Americana? If not ...[/quote]

I would have thought you might have figured out by now that I'm not buying into your "under-representation.

But in answer to your question, you mean LatinX performers like Gaby Moreno, Carla Morrison , Las Cafeteras, Lindi Ortega, Rabbit and Lorenzo, Carrie Rodriguez, Davíd Garza, and the aforementioned Raul Malo and Eddie Perez of The Mavericks?

Would the Americana community be so stupid as to purposefully restrict a possible growing audience? I dont fucking think so.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 3:32 pm 
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Would the Americana community be so stupid as to purposefully restrict a possible growing audience? I dont fucking think so.


It would not be the first time a music community did so.

When's the last time you asked a Latinx person blaring [whatever music you don't approve of] under 50 about Mavis Staples?

Or any non-Black person?

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I've never said this about glen accurately pointing out your racism before, and I defy you to post a link to any post where I have.

With this race baiting comment outta carmen, I feel I owe the guy [glen] an apology.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 3:47 pm 
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Led Zeppelin is just Delta Blues put through Fenders and Marshalls.


Wrong. But I'm not surprised that on top of everything else you're an expert on the creative process.

Led Zeppelin is not "just" anything.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 20, 2019 3:55 pm 
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Wrong. But I'm not surprised that on top of everything else you're an expert on the creative process.

Led Zeppelin is not "just" anything.


I'm not claiming expertise on the creative process any more than you're claiming expertise on what virtuosity is. But yes, I do know quite a bit about it, and have no problem discussing the topic as informed by that aspect of my experience and knowledgebase.

I am also a Led Zeppelin fan, so there's no point in getting overdefensive.

When's the last time you asked any Black person under 50 if they're familiar with Mavis Staples? Or other musical acts you personally approve of?

How about asking this of any non-Black people under 50?

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I've never said this about glen accurately pointing out your racism before, and I defy you to post a link to any post where I have.

With this race baiting comment outta carmen, I feel I owe the guy [glen] an apology.


Last edited by carmenjonze on Fri Sep 20, 2019 4:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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