RadioFreeLiberal.com

Smart Voices, Be Heard
It is currently Wed Oct 17, 2018 1:08 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 40 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2018 1:29 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jun 08, 2011 11:53 am
Posts: 13616
World temperature map is pretty scary. Southern hemisphere is indeed in midwinter, a couple of weeks after the solstice, and it's hotter than all hell in a lot of places. I wonder if this is the first planetary heat wave.


The article I read is the most alarmist CC scientists now saying they were wrong, that it is TWICE as bad as even they thought.

The least alarmist CC scientists now saying TWICE as bad. I truly and sincerely WANT to see deniers suffer for their denial because as far as I am concerned they are MURDERING MY FAMILY

_________________
I dont criticize other liberals, even when I disagree with them. United fronts work better! But that is just me.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2018 1:56 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:10 pm
Posts: 17534
Location: The blue parts of the map
The power company is now calling it a "heat storm." Presumably, that makes them look better, if they can write it off to Force Majeure.

Back in the real world:

Quote:
Storm:

(N.) 1. a disturbance of the normal condition of the atmosphere, manifesting itself by winds of unusual force or direction, often accompanied by rain, snow, hail, thunder, and lightning, or flying sand or dust.

2. a heavy fall of rain, snow, or hail, or a violent outbreak of thunder and lightning, unaccompanied by strong winds.

3. Also called violent storm. Meteorology. a wind of 64–72 miles per hour (29–32 m/sec).

4. a violent military assault on a fortified place, strong position, or the like.

5. a heavy or sudden volley or discharge: a storm of criticism; a storm of bullets.

6. a violent disturbance of affairs, as a civil, political, social, or domestic commotion.

7. a violent outburst or outbreak of expression: a storm of applause.


http://www.dictionary.com/browse/storm?q=storm

Note that all these involve turbulence, fury, violence, or some other sort of commotion. I realize that commotion is relative in L.A., but still. Is the earthquake going to be a "motion storm?" I hate this place.

_________________
We used to hang our traitors. Now we elect them to lead us.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:56 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2013 3:07 am
Posts: 10568
The power company is now calling it a "heat storm." Presumably, that makes them look better, if they can write it off to Force Majeure.

Back in the real world:



http://www.dictionary.com/browse/storm?q=storm

Note that all these involve turbulence, fury, violence, or some other sort of commotion. I realize that commotion is relative in L.A., but still. Is the earthquake going to be a "motion storm?" I hate this place.


It takes 144 Btu per pound to melt ice and raise the temperature one degree, from 32F to 33F. Then to continue raising the temperature of water it only takes 1 Btu per degree, per pound.

In the middle of the night I have melted tons of ice. It seems like it only gets noticed in the middle of the night that those big coffin freezers in supermarkets are thawing out, so the call comes in in the middle of the night.

I would arrive already knowing what was wrong, the drains had clogged with ice and the coils had continued to condense moisture and freeze it, and the defrost cycles would have melted that ice but, unable to go down the drain that water flowed into a growing glacier which was the size of width times length of the coffin freezer times about ten inches in depth where it would refreeze never to be melted by the defrost elements again, it would just add another layer. This process would have been going on for a couple of months before it would be noticed.

Several tons of thawing food sitting above a hard frozen glacier ten inches thick. I would get a crew of store stockers organized, their job was to pull the thawing food off of the top, sort it good from the bad and stuff the good in backroom freezers and coolers, and throw it away what had gone bad.

I would get my hot water hoses out and hook them to the stores hot water heater, attach a nozzle, put on gloves because the nozzle would get hot. The first thing was to cut that ice above the drain down to the drain and get it so it could drain away the melt water. After opening up a drain the hot water would be pretty much used up and the slow process of melting tons of ice with cold water would begin. Hours would go by.

Now I'm about to make an observation which applies to the climate. At first I would pour on water and if anything the amount of ice would increase somewhat because minus 30 ice would freeze some of the water I would pour on as the ice flow was warming up to 32 degrees. Then when the ice flow was warmed up to 32 degrees it had to be warmed up to 33 degrees. That takes 144 Btu per pound, and every pound of cold water I would pour on it would have about 20 to 30 Btu's to give to that process. Five to eight pounds of cold tap water to melt one pound of ice, after the ice has reached 32 degrees.

I would pour and pour water on and not much would happen. But eventually that ice flow would be warmed through and through and that 144 Btu per pound of energy would be satisfied. Then all of sudden the ice would begin to melt away quickly with ease and very little more cold water was needed.


That is what has happened year and years have gone by while the polar ice sheets have been absorbing excess heat, but had been staying frozen. But eventually that ice reached 32 degrees at which point it still absorbed the excess energy until it had absorbed an additional 144 Btu's of energy per pound. That process has been going on for years. 50, 80, maybe a 100 years. Now that ice is gone, the ballast effect is gone.

The Oceans are now free of the polar ice mass thermal heat sink, that ballast, and now they are free to warm up. From now on it will take very little excess energy to warm one pound of sea water up one degree, about one BTU.

That's the dynamic fix we're in. It's going to hurt. Things are going to happen quickly now. The ice on the land at the south pole is going to melt away and flow into the sea. :(


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2018 11:20 am 
Offline
Board Emeritus

Joined: Mon Jun 06, 2011 10:27 pm
Posts: 8278
Location: miles from nowhere

It takes 144 Btu per pound to melt ice and raise the temperature one degree, from 32F to 33F. Then to continue raising the temperature of water it only takes 1 Btu per degree, per pound.

In the middle of the night I have melted tons of ice. It seems like it only gets noticed in the middle of the night that those big coffin freezers in supermarkets are thawing out, so the call comes in in the middle of the night.

I would arrive already knowing what was wrong, the drains had clogged with ice and the coils had continued to condense moisture and freeze it, and the defrost cycles would have melted that ice but, unable to go down the drain that water flowed into a growing glacier which was the size of width times length of the coffin freezer times about ten inches in depth where it would refreeze never to be melted by the defrost elements again, it would just add another layer. This process would have been going on for a couple of months before it would be noticed.

Several tons of thawing food sitting above a hard frozen glacier ten inches thick. I would get a crew of store stockers organized, their job was to pull the thawing food off of the top, sort it good from the bad and stuff the good in backroom freezers and coolers, and throw it away what had gone bad.

I would get my hot water hoses out and hook them to the stores hot water heater, attach a nozzle, put on gloves because the nozzle would get hot. The first thing was to cut that ice above the drain down to the drain and get it so it could drain away the melt water. After opening up a drain the hot water would be pretty much used up and the slow process of melting tons of ice with cold water would begin. Hours would go by.

Now I'm about to make an observation which applies to the climate. At first I would pour on water and if anything the amount of ice would increase somewhat because minus 30 ice would freeze some of the water I would pour on as the ice flow was warming up to 32 degrees. Then when the ice flow was warmed up to 32 degrees it had to be warmed up to 33 degrees. That takes 144 Btu per pound, and every pound of cold water I would pour on it would have about 20 to 30 Btu's to give to that process. Five to eight pounds of cold tap water to melt one pound of ice, after the ice has reached 32 degrees.

I would pour and pour water on and not much would happen. But eventually that ice flow would be warmed through and through and that 144 Btu per pound of energy would be satisfied. Then all of sudden the ice would begin to melt away quickly with ease and very little more cold water was needed.


That is what has happened year and years have gone by while the polar ice sheets have been absorbing excess heat, but had been staying frozen. But eventually that ice reached 32 degrees at which point it still absorbed the excess energy until it had absorbed an additional 144 Btu's of energy per pound. That process has been going on for years. 50, 80, maybe a 100 years. Now that ice is gone, the ballast effect is gone.

The Oceans are now free of the polar ice mass thermal heat sink, that ballast, and now they are free to warm up. From now on it will take very little excess energy to warm one pound of sea water up one degree, about one BTU.

That's the dynamic fix we're in. It's going to hurt. Things are going to happen quickly now. The ice on the land at the south pole is going to melt away and flow into the sea. :(

Not to mention Greenland’s ice as well.

_________________
bird's theorem-"we the people" are stupid.

"No one is so foolish as to choose war over peace. In peace sons bury their fathers, in war fathers bury their sons." - Herodotus

The new motto of the USA: Unum de multis. Out of one, many.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jul 14, 2018 11:06 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2013 3:07 am
Posts: 10568
It's fire time here. Got a big one growing to the north east, about 15 miles away. Aircraft have been flying over the house all day.

It's called the Ferguson Fire and it's in the national news because it killed a fire fighter this morning. It's in a straight up and down kind of place. About in the spot where a major land slide slid Highway 140 off into the river about 15 years ago and they still have not fixed it. They don't know how to fix it. They put two temporary one lane bridges in and have the highway diverted to the other side of the river for now.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 8:30 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:10 pm
Posts: 17534
Location: The blue parts of the map
I was wondering how close you were to that one.

_________________
We used to hang our traitors. Now we elect them to lead us.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 8:39 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2013 3:07 am
Posts: 10568
The fire grew today, what it was yesterday times 20.

The DC 10 has flown over my house about 8 or 10 times. I fly's over, and I mean right over head at about 200 to 300 feet with it's flaps extended, flying slow. When it is exactly over my house it makes a slight turn toward the north.

Besides the DC-10 there are many other aircraft flying overhead making a slight turn toward the north when they are exactly over my house. My house is an aircraft landmark.

Every minute and a half like clock work an aircraft flies over head. At about 200 to 300 feet. The big ones shake the ground.


I saw a new one today, a Bell AH-1 Cobra. I haven't seen one of those attack helicopters since the early 80's. They have a distinctive silhouette. The fuselage is only a meter wide, and it has stubby wings below the rotor. I looked it up and the forest service has converted two of them for firefighting. They would be good for that, they certainly can lift and haul the weight. But I thought they were all gone.


They made everyone leave Jerseydale. An improvement. :D


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 8:51 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2013 3:07 am
Posts: 10568
I was wondering how close you were to that one.


Yesterday I was about 15 miles from it. According to the latest midnight yesterday map I'm now about 10 miles from it. I'll know how far I'm from it now about 2:00 PM tomorrow.

Based on what I'm seeing from the ground I would say this one is blowing up. I think it will mostly run toward the north east in the afternoon, and dodge back toward me to the southwest in the middle of the night like it did last night.

It wouldn't surprise me at all to get a telephone call tonight or tomorrow night around midnight from the sheriff's department. A gorge is between me and it. But the last few years the sheriff's department has been pretty darned liberal about giving out those evacuation orders, just making sure.

I don't think I will actually be at risk.


They turn the power off now when they give an evacuation order. That does get people moving. :|


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 12:15 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:10 pm
Posts: 17534
Location: The blue parts of the map
The fire grew today, what it was yesterday times 20.

The DC 10 has flown over my house about 8 or 10 times. I fly's over, and I mean right over head at about 200 to 300 feet with it's flaps extended, flying slow. When it is exactly over my house it makes a slight turn toward the north.

Besides the DC-10 there are many other aircraft flying overhead making a slight turn toward the north when they are exactly over my house. My house is an aircraft landmark.

Every minute and a half like clock work an aircraft flies over head. At about 200 to 300 feet. The big ones shake the ground.


I saw a new one today, a Bell AH-1 Cobra. I haven't seen one of those attack helicopters since the early 80's. They have a distinctive silhouette. The fuselage is only a meter wide, and it has stubby wings below the rotor. I looked it up and the forest service has converted two of them for firefighting. They would be good for that, they certainly can lift and haul the weight. But I thought they were all gone.


They made everyone leave Jerseydale. An improvement. :D


There used to be a Cobra at Long Beach Airport, still in its military livery. I would imagine it was a story ship for shoots. The thing is certainly something to look at.

I didn't see it there last time I went by a couple of months ago. Maybe out, or maybe retired.

_________________
We used to hang our traitors. Now we elect them to lead us.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2018 12:27 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:10 pm
Posts: 17534
Location: The blue parts of the map
It's not stopping.

Above normal temperatures persist in L.A., and now another excessive heat warning for a prolonged event probably lasting the rest of this week. Once again, the power company says its neglected infrastructure is ready. That's what they said last time.

Check out the weather data. It's been absolutely ridiculous everywhere from Texas west and Missouri south for weeks now. Same in Europe (many fires). Meanwhile, there are dire predictions of cities in India becoming heat death factories.

But nothing's wrong with the climate.

_________________
We used to hang our traitors. Now we elect them to lead us.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2018 2:25 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:10 pm
Posts: 17534
Location: The blue parts of the map
I've been talking about a global heat wave. I see maps. I check data. I know things. Catastrophic fires in Sweden and Greece. UK is hot and dry, and considering a watering ban. A ban on watering grass. In the UK. That's like snow in July in Wisconsin.

I've been saying the jet stream is completely bizarre this summer. That gets blank stares. Huh? It's like, "Are you smoking that stuff again?"

Eppur si muove.

BBC:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-44936622

Quote:
There's never one single factor that explains hot weather around the world.

The BBC's science editor David Shukman says: "What is striking now is that multiple heatwaves are happening at the same time."

"The key is the jet stream. This year it's been meandering in great loops and the UK has ended up to the south of it. Add to that sea temperatures similar to previous heatwaves and climate change, the warming of the atmosphere - it all makes heatwaves more likely.

"Climate scientists are not saying we will get heatwaves every year. But they do say the risks of extreme heat are going up."


One of these loops dips south in the Western US. Just like it should in November. But this is not November.

_________________
We used to hang our traitors. Now we elect them to lead us.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2018 5:08 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:10 pm
Posts: 17534
Location: The blue parts of the map
Actually wrong, the dip has moved more to the middle of the country and now it rains continuously in the mid-Atlantic.

The jet stream is supposed to be on vacation in Canada until later in the year. No vacation this year.

The really striking change is in the UK. Surely you've been to the UK, or at least seen pictures of it. It's a green country, or was. Lush green lawns, grass growing everywhere, even their racing color is green. Except this year, all the grass in the UK is gone. Dead. Brown or nonexistent. A few small patches get watered, but the one thing for sure was that you didn't need sprinkler pipes in the UK. Until this year. And after August 5th in parts of England you won't be able to use them or hoses or anything. Not enough water.

Photos here:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-44923654

Hyde Park in London... no grass AT ALL. Photo in Greenwich of the huge park there, looking down from the observatory. Previously an amazing expanse of lush British lawn. No grass AT ALL. It's brown. Etc.

Our president tells us there's nothing wrong with the climate, and that we should all be burning coal.

_________________
We used to hang our traitors. Now we elect them to lead us.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2018 1:30 am 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 12, 2013 3:07 am
Posts: 10568

There used to be a Cobra at Long Beach Airport, still in its military livery. I would imagine it was a story ship for shoots. The thing is certainly something to look at.

I didn't see it there last time I went by a couple of months ago. Maybe out, or maybe retired.


It's been two weeks since I last mentioned the fire. Another person killed, mean trees, I try to spot them before they spot me.

:|


The smoke lays in around midnight, lays in until noon. It is too thick to more than pass through. The fire fighting activity has for the most part moved elsewhere. It's been more than a week since it seemed plausible it would come by here.


Tonight a breathless NBC announcer at the end of an emotional piece said, but we can derive hope in the announcement that the fire is 26% contained. Saying this fire is 26% contained is about like saying the fire has been burning for days.

:|


Fires have to move to survive. When a fire moves one direction and it doesn't turn back, it contains itself by that movement, it contains about 25% of its active perimeter, one whole side. It cannot go back to where it has been.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2018 1:55 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:10 pm
Posts: 17534
Location: The blue parts of the map
Thanks for the update on the Ferguson fire. All we get here is that Yosemite Is Closed, as if that never happened before.

I heard about the tree fatality down here, though. The Nooz does love their death thing.

Nooz is also determined to show us the same three burned houses outside Redding, over and over again, with different people standing in front of them telling us how awful it all is. What they don't seem able to show is how we had a classic firestorm a la Dresden in WWII. It sucked air so hard that the wind took out everything the fire didn't.

Last night I was reading statistics that indicate the western US is indeed ground zero for climate change, at least in this hemisphere. If trends continue, which they never do, what we now call a heat wave will be the normal weather. Suddenly, the local Nooz has found a new way to scare people. It talks about little else.

L.A.'s crumbling infrastructure struck again last night, dropping power to Dodger Stadium during a game. It cut over to backup, which is a separate 34 kV primary circuit, but it was a half hour getting everything going again. Warming up the kind of discharge lamps they use in stadiums is 10-15 minutes right there. During the break, those who had switched to the Arizona game saw that one stop too. They had a haboob. Lots of haboobs this year.

_________________
We used to hang our traitors. Now we elect them to lead us.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 01, 2018 1:20 pm 
Offline
Board Emeritus
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:10 pm
Posts: 17534
Location: The blue parts of the map
Carr Fire updates trickle in as more numbers become available. Nothing's final.

Last Updated: August 01, 2018 7:53 am
Date/Time Started: July 23, 2018 1:15 pm
Administrative Unit: Unified Command: CAL FIRE Shasta-Trinity Unit, Redding City Fire and Whiskeytown National Park
County: Shasta County,Trinity County
Location: Hwy 299 and Carr Powerhouse Rd, Whiskeytown
Acres Burned - Containment: 115,538 acres - 35% contained
Structures Threatened: 2,546
Structures Destroyed: 1,018 residences, 12 commerical structures, 435 outbuildings destroyed


Meanwhile the Mendocino Complex (River and Ranch fires) is coming up fast:

Location: off Highway 20 near Potter Valley, northeast of Ukiah
Acres Burned - Containment: 59,014 acres - 15% contained
Structures Threatened: 10,200
Structures Destroyed: 10 residences / 1 outbuildings

Conditions: Last night firefighters made good progress on increasing containment on the River and Ranch fires. Today fire personnel will continue to work on containment lines, fighting the fire directly when access and conditions permit along with building contignecy lines ahead of the fire front. Low humidity, heat, and wind will continue to challenge firefighters throughout the day today. Today we joined in Unified Command with the U.S. Forest Service Northern California Team 2.

_________________
We used to hang our traitors. Now we elect them to lead us.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 40 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: bengal59 and 12 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group