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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 8:25 pm 
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Working from home means I have a TV in my remote office so I monitor all the various news conferences of the day. Today I listened to Gov Cuomo's news conference. Seems he is doing a good job with a very tough problem. And I just got through with the Task Force press conference. It seems the question of today is how long can we afford to shut down the country and what is our comprehensive strategy for addressing both the health crisis and the economic crisis.

So I thought I would put it to the board. What do you think. What should be the strategy? The President wants to open the country back up sooner rather than later. Gov Cuomo recognizes that the economy and effect the virus is having on the economy is extremely serious. So what are your thoughts as to what we should or could do?

My personal thought is to give this a few more weeks to see how the numbers are trending in various parts of the country. In the meantime, we need to have some folks developing a strategy to allow businesses in areas of the country that are not hotspots to go back to work. Depending on decisions made by state and local governments. IOW, try to find a balance that protects the public health while minimizing the damage to the economy.

I am interested in what my more progressive friends think we should do?


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 8:35 pm 
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Far far longer than if almost any other human being alive was president...

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 8:50 pm 
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In the of Michaelangelo ( via Charlton Heston), "When It Is Done".

Which means this will last as long as it lasts.

But a better person to ask would Orange Shit Gibbon, who decided to ignore warnings early on (in January). That asshole is more interested in protecting his numbers and his reelection than the Health and Well Being of the American People.

He has been lying about possible cures and passing deliberate lies about cures that do not work.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:12 pm 
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today it doenst matter how long since most everything we've known will become different.

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Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:20 pm 
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In the of Michaelangelo ( via Charlton Heston), "When It Is Done".

Which means this will last as long as it lasts.

But a better person to ask would Orange Shit Gibbon, who decided to ignore warnings early on (in January). That asshole is more interested in protecting his numbers and his reelection than the Health and Well Being of the American People.

He has been lying about possible cures and passing deliberate lies about cures that do not work.

Not sure which party Michael belonged to but pretty sure Check was a Republican.
To be fair, I don't know what decision I would have made if I had been in his chair. I can see where it would be a difficult call to shutdown the largest economy in the world. To some the strategy might seem obvious. I don't have a crystal ball. If I did I would have gone to cash a month ago. I mean really think about it. Think of all the lost jobs, lost businesses, lost savings. The ripple effects of such a decision are many and the potential economic damage could run very deep. Not an easy decision to make. For anyone. True, Trump doesn't inspire confidence and he has no real credibility with anyone. He creates more confusion and uncertainty. All of that is true. But, he didn't create this problem and I highly doubt he could have prevented it if he had closed us down in February. It's a highly contagious virus and we are a people who travel all over the world and all over this country. So now that it is here. What do we do? I get you don't like where we are? Do you have any thoughts to strategy?


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:25 pm 
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today it doenst matter how long since most everything we've known will become different.

I remember hearing that after 911 and also after the 2008 crash and yet we survived and recovered. We figured out a way to move forward. I am not one to wait locked in my home for the next shoe to fall. The ship sprung a leak. We can wait for it to sink or we can think of ways to patch the leaks and get to shore.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:33 pm 
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I'm a bowling league secretary which means I run the league, handle the money/banking, work with the local USBC office concerning awards, etc.. and last week, with agreement from our other two board officers, we decided to pause the league for six weeks. I didn't think this crisis would be over in 2 - 4 weeks but maybe in six weeks things will start to get back to normal. If not, we'll end the league and send out prize money through the mail.

As to what strategy we should use I agree with governors issuing stay-at-home to reduce the spread of the virus. If possible, I'd also like to see federal, state, and local governments do like China did spraying streets, buildings, offices, businesses, restrauants, homes, etc.. to kill the virus. Until a vaccine is produced and mass inoculations given, business as normal doesn't work.

Trump wants to open the country back up for business because he's been counting on the stock market to re-elect him. I don't think Trump has empathy for the average American because he's a person almost devoid of empathy. All he's concerned about his himself, his family, and his ego.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:38 pm 
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I remember hearing that after 911 and also after the 2008 crash and yet we survived and recovered. We figured out a way to move forward. I am not one to wait locked in my home for the next shoe to fall. The ship sprung a leak. We can wait for it to sink or we can think of ways to patch the leaks and get to shore.

see where i live the law says "stay at home"...so waiting locked in my home is sorta the norm now.

hope youre not trying the capitalist bootstap thingy cuz that bullshit holds nothing today.
idaho hasnt ceased anything so maybe theyre doing the bootstrap thingy..but i doubt it
not with a growing number of cases.

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Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:40 pm 
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I remember hearing that after 911 and also after the 2008 crash and yet we survived and recovered. We figured out a way to move forward. I am not one to wait locked in my home for the next shoe to fall. The ship sprung a leak. We can wait for it to sink or we can think of ways to patch the leaks and get to shore.

As you said, we survived and the 2008 crash and we will survive this crisis. Just as the 2008 crash, the recovery will take years (I'm guessing four to five years). I feel for people who've lost their jobs or who can't go to work and aren't getting paid. I feel for those who began their working years around 2001 and suffered the effects of 911 and then the Great Depression and now the Coronavirus. They're taking two steps forward and then getting slammed to the ground.

All I can say is I'm glad I'm retired and not facing possible unemployment.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:41 pm 
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I'm a bowling league secretary which means I run the league, handle the money/banking, work with the local USBC office concerning awards, etc.. and last week, with agreement from our other two board officers, we decided to pause the league for six weeks. I didn't think this crisis would be over in 2 - 4 weeks but maybe in six weeks things will start to get back to normal. If not, we'll end the league and send out prize money through the mail.

As to what strategy we should use I agree with governors issuing stay-at-home to reduce the spread of the virus. If possible, I'd also like to see federal, state, and local governments do like China did spraying streets, buildings, offices, businesses, restrauants, homes, etc.. to kill the virus. Until a vaccine is produced and mass inoculations given, business as normal doesn't work.

Trump wants to open the country back up for business because he's been counting on the stock market to re-elect him. I don't think Trump has empathy for the average American because he's a person almost devoid of empathy. All he's concerned about his himself, his family, and his ego.


are we like the only contry NOT doing a large spray....yeh the gop senate isnt taking this seriously at all.
but, now that they are falling into self quarantines and getting positives back...this may change.

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Who are these...flag-sucking halfwits fleeced fooled by stupid little rich kids They speak for all that is cruel stupid
They are racists hate mongers I piss down the throats of these Nazis Im too old to worry whether they like it Fuck them.
HST.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:44 pm 
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Working from home means I have a TV in my remote office so I monitor all the various news conferences of the day. Today I listened to Gov Cuomo's news conference. Seems he is doing a good job with a very tough problem. And I just got through with the Task Force press conference. It seems the question of today is how long can we afford to shut down the country and what is our comprehensive strategy for addressing both the health crisis and the economic crisis.

So I thought I would put it to the board. What do you think. What should be the strategy? The President wants to open the country back up sooner rather than later. Gov Cuomo recognizes that the economy and effect the virus is having on the economy is extremely serious. So what are your thoughts as to what we should or could do?

My personal thought is to give this a few more weeks to see how the numbers are trending in various parts of the country. In the meantime, we need to have some folks developing a strategy to allow businesses in areas of the country that are not hotspots to go back to work. Depending on decisions made by state and local governments. IOW, try to find a balance that protects the public health while minimizing the damage to the economy.

I am interested in what my more progressive friends think we should do?


I think anyone of working age who thinks they have the slightest chance they've contracted this virus to by all means necessary get tested. Be pushy if they have to to get tested. And if they do get a positive test guard that testing document like as if they had thousands of dollars in their hot sweaty hands. A lottery of luck they would hold, they will be amoung a rare minor fraction of just one percent of the work force who would be certifiably immune. Kind of like gold.

Oh the possibilities in quickly seizing the moment, switching jobs right then to make the most of such a rarefied opportunity to significantly increase ones pay short term with the possibility to coast that advantage into the post apocalyptic era and enjoy higher pay and position all the rest of ones life.

Like for instance I could go to the competition where there would be no yoke of "you ought to be loyal" and point out to the boss there that there would be places I could go where there would be jobs I could do no one else could do. The boss could use that wedge to charge extra for special service and get his company into a position to be dealing with accounts which would advance his profit for years to come.

:)

In other words Joe I think it will be eighteen months before things can go back to normal.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:48 pm 
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I'm a bowling league secretary which means I run the league, handle the money/banking, work with the local USBC office concerning awards, etc.. and last week, with agreement from our other two board officers, we decided to pause the league for six weeks. I didn't think this crisis would be over in 2 - 4 weeks but maybe in six weeks things will start to get back to normal. If not, we'll end the league and send out prize money through the mail.

As to what strategy we should use I agree with governors issuing stay-at-home to reduce the spread of the virus. If possible, I'd also like to see federal, state, and local governments do like China did spraying streets, buildings, offices, businesses, restrauants, homes, etc.. to kill the virus. Until a vaccine is produced and mass inoculations given, business as normal doesn't work.

Trump wants to open the country back up for business because he's been counting on the stock market to re-elect him. I don't think Trump has empathy for the average American because he's a person almost devoid of empathy. All he's concerned about his himself, his family, and his ego.

To be honest, I don't give a shit what motivates Trump. This isn't about Trump. It isn't about Biden, McConnell, McCarthy, Schumer or Pelosi. It isn't about any of them. It's about the folks in the hospital, the unemployed, the middle class taxpayer who is worried about their 401K, the old folks who are worried about leaving their homes, and on and on and on.

I'll be honest with you. I don't think we can go with a complete shutdown for 6 to 8 weeks. Maybe we can but I don't see how without doing a significant amount of damage to the economy. I don't think we can "wait and see what happens". We need to start working on plan B,C and D. We need to be looking for solutions that work around problems. Folks who want to make this all about politics run the risk of political blowback from the folks who are going to suffer and pay the price of the crisis. If I were an elected official, I would be about solving problems rather than political positioning. So at the moment, I don't care about party. We all need to be rowing the boat.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:55 pm 
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I think anyone of working age who thinks they have the slightest chance they've contracted this virus to by all means necessary get tested. Be pushy if they have to to get tested. And if they do get a positive test guard that testing document like as if they had thousands of dollars in their hot sweaty hands. A lottery of luck they would hold, they will be amoung a rare minor fraction of just one percent of the work force who would be certifiably immune. Kind of like gold.

Oh the possibilities in quickly seizing the moment, switching jobs right then to make the most of such a rarefied opportunity to significantly increase ones pay short term with the possibility to coast that advantage into the post apocalyptic era and enjoy higher pay and position all the rest of ones life.

Like for instance I could go to the competition where there would be no yoke of "you ought to be loyal" and point out to the boss there that there would be places I could go where there would be jobs I could do no one else could do. The boss could use that wedge to charge extra for special service and get his company into a position to be dealing with accounts which would advance his profit for years to come.

:)

In other words Joe I think it will be eighteen months before things can go back to normal.


Back to normal is a destination. The question is how long we stay hunkered down and how effective a strategy that is. Also is the question of what we can afford to do from an economic perspective. I know it sounds cold but I used to do business turnaround work. You have to step back and look at things from an unemotional point of view. I am not saying you can't look at problems subjectively. You should. But it's just as dangerous and just as damaging and harmful not to look at problems objectively. It's often seeing the same issue from different perspectives that leads to effective solutions.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:17 pm 
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It's interesting how this question was posed.

Social distancing is impacting more than just the economy. It's also interfering with basic human relationships. You have people quarantined and isolated from other family members. There are elderly people in communities here in Florida that cannot receive visits from family members, and have not for weeks. Children have been taken out of their K-12 schooling. For some, this has meant difficulty getting school lunches and other things they depend on. Right now, the Monroe County Mayor has essentially cut the Keys off from the rest of Florida and isolated the people living there.

This is without getting to all the basic kinds of sacrifices of all kinds of social activities that people can no longer engage in.

So it's not like it's just the economy vs. public health. There's more being affected by these isolating orders. I haven't even gotten to the inability to do political organizing or rallies.

Still, one thing I take from my ethical tradition is saving and protecting life is more important than anything else. Of the elderly and the vulnerable. When it comes to weighing public health vs. the other things, I am going to cooperate with public health.

They have not ordered a complete lockdown for Miami Dade but I will comply with it if they deem it necessary. I am not worried for myself if I catch the coronavirus ... I'll survive I'm sure ... I am worried about others near me.

I agree with the observation that a return to normalcy would have been easier if we had better, more accurate ways of assessing prevalence. The lack of testing creates the uncertainty that interferes with better decisionmaking by our officials.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:27 pm 
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BTW, Amy Klobuchar's husband is in the hospital right now, fighting the virus. He will probably make it thru, but she is unable to visit him at all in the hospital. Cannot see him at all.

There are human costs to social distancing that go beyond the economic impacts, as I said. Tragic ... but necessary, as she herself realizes.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:42 pm 
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Back to normal is a destination. The question is how long we stay hunkered down and how effective a strategy that is. Also is the question of what we can afford to do from an economic perspective. I know it sounds cold but I used to do business turnaround work. You have to step back and look at things from an unemotional point of view. I am not saying you can't look at problems subjectively. You should. But it's just as dangerous and just as damaging and harmful not to look at problems objectively. It's often seeing the same issue from different perspectives that leads to effective solutions.


Joe that argument tries to objectify subjective reasoning. You're using subjective frame elements to argue for looking at problems objectively. An example of a subjective element you used is "afford" and it would seem "unemotional point of view" would be subjective as well. All elements of this are dangerous, damaging, and harmful, the reality of this is in maintaining a balancing act.

I've seen in the statistical numbers how well the current measures are squishing the spread. Keeping the infected population down into a thousandth's percentile. Without these measures in place history provides numerous examples where the spread would be 15 or 20 percent by now, expanding to engulfing the majority.

I have not seen in the line in the USA Active Cases plot bend over a maximum and begin descending down. I've seen that happen in China's active cases plot. Their first wave event is almost over. So far they have achieved and are maintaining full containment. But they are not done. They can lighten up and go back to work but there will most likely be another wave, another season. It's not over.

They lead us by about eight weeks. In eight weeks we may be able to lighten up and go back to work. But do be prepared to lock down again, and perhaps again as the successive waves pass.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2020 11:45 pm 
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It's interesting how this question was posed.

Social distancing is impacting more than just the economy. It's also interfering with basic human relationships. You have people quarantined and isolated from other family members. There are elderly people in communities here in Florida that cannot receive visits from family members, and have not for weeks. Children have been taken out of their K-12 schooling. For some, this has meant difficulty getting school lunches and other things they depend on. Right now, the Monroe County Mayor has essentially cut the Keys off from the rest of Florida and isolated the people living there.

This is without getting to all the basic kinds of sacrifices of all kinds of social activities that people can no longer engage in.

So it's not like it's just the economy vs. public health. There's more being affected by these isolating orders. I haven't even gotten to the inability to do political organizing or rallies.

Still, one thing I take from my ethical tradition is saving and protecting life is more important than anything else. Of the elderly and the vulnerable. When it comes to weighing public health vs. the other things, I am going to cooperate with public health.

They have not ordered a complete lockdown for Miami Dade but I will comply with it if they deem it necessary. I am not worried for myself if I catch the coronavirus ... I'll survive I'm sure ... I am worried about others near me.

I agree with the observation that a return to normalcy would have been easier if we had better, more accurate ways of assessing prevalence. The lack of testing creates the uncertainty that interferes with better decisionmaking by our officials.



The question was poised from my point of view. How else would I poise it? I don't have children. My parents are deceased. My siblings don't live nearby and I talk to them by phone. I'm a business person who used to do turnarounds so I have some appreciation how this type of disruption affects business. g a You make this sound like looking at this objectively and considering all of the consequences of a decision implies not caring for your fellow man. I also have some appreciation how the ripple effects of business failures affect the lives of the people who work or depend on all those businesses. Have you ever had the responsibility over payroll? Have you ever closed a business? Have you ever had to lay off people of all ages knowing the pain they and their families were about to go through being unemployed? Have you ever taken anyone through bankruptcy? So there's plenty of pain and suffering to go around. I'm just trying to figure out how to minimize the effect that has on the lives of people going forward. That pain and suffering has consequences every bit as real as any illness.

I am not advocating violating any local emergency pronouncements. I am currently complying with the work from home rule even though we aren't under a shelter in place rule. I am just suggesting that there might be things we can do to put the nation back to work while protecting those most at risk from this disease.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:00 am 
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Joe that argument tries to objectify subjective reasoning. You're using subjective frame elements to argue for looking at problems objectively. An example of a subjective element you used is "afford" and it would seem "unemotional point of view" would be subjective as well. All elements of this are dangerous, damaging, and harmful, the reality of this is in maintaining a balancing act.

I've seen in the statistical numbers how well the current measures are squishing the spread. Keeping the infected population down into a thousandth's percentile. Without these measures in place history provides numerous examples where the spread would be 15 or 20 percent by now, expanding to engulfing the majority.

I have not seen in the line in the USA Active Cases plot bend over a maximum and begin descending down. I've seen that happen in China's active cases plot. Their first wave event is almost over. So far they have achieved and are maintaining full containment. But they are not done. They can lighten up and go back to work but there will most likely be another wave, another season. It's not over.

They lead us by about eight weeks. In eight weeks we may be able to lighten up and go back to work. But do be prepared to lock down again, and perhaps again as the successive waves pass.

To be honest, I am not sure I understand "objectify subjective reasoning". But that aside, I always try to look at these things unemotionally and based upon facts before I consider the more emotional elements. Nobody I know wants people to die from this illness. Nobody I know wants the economy to crash and to go into depression or recession. But fact is the economy cycles from time to time despite all our efforts and people die every day despite our best efforts. Viruses happen. This is not the first and it won't be the last and more people will die from viruses. I may very well be one of them. We accept a certain number of deaths each year from the flu. Could we cut that number by social distancing or sheltering in place during the flu season. Maybe. I don't know.

We need to figure out a way to combat the spread of the virus and protect those most at risk. But we must also consider the effect that has on our economy and our ability to fight the next virus or meet the next challenge. These are tough choices with significant consequences. There aren't any perfect or easy solutions.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:42 am 
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To be honest, I am not sure I understand "objectify subjective reasoning". But that aside, I always try to look at these things unemotionally and based upon facts before I consider the more emotional elements. Nobody I know wants people to die from this illness. Nobody I know wants the economy to crash and to go into depression or recession. But fact is the economy cycles from time to time despite all our efforts and people die every day despite our best efforts. Viruses happen. This is not the first and it won't be the last and more people will die from viruses. I may very well be one of them. We accept a certain number of deaths each year from the flu. Could we cut that number by social distancing or sheltering in place during the flu season. Maybe. I don't know.

We need to figure out a way to combat the spread of the virus and protect those most at risk. But we must also consider the effect that has on our economy and our ability to fight the next virus or meet the next challenge. These are tough choices with significant consequences. There aren't any perfect or easy solutions.


Objectifying subjective reasoning is one of those phrases which would be hard to say with a straight face Joe. It was my way of pointing out that much of what is perceived as being hard and fast bedrock surfaces of economic measure are actually elements of subjective reasoning, not made of solid unyielding earth.

Soft metrology is an ever ongoing study, a continuation of work began by Hume, developing the techniques and models for measuring quantities related to perception.

For instance the question how long we stay hunkered down and how effective a strategy is, requires a subjective evaluation of the qualities of what goals being effective applies to, and then creating a strategy for measuring it and then placing a value upon it. That evaluation has to deal with issues like the value assigned to a human life, so it gets sticky.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2020 5:27 am 
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i've now counted three politicians in three different articles that are pushing this concept in recent days.

This is the latest.....

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/tex ... 31075.html
Texas Lt. Governor suggests the elderly should risk their lives to save the economy
“Tucker, no one reached out to me and said, ‘As a senior citizen, are you willing to take a chance on your survival in exchange for keeping the America that all America loves for your children and grandchildren?’ And if that’s the exchange, I’m all in,” Patrick said, later adding, “My message is, let’s get back to work. Let’s get back to living. Let’s be smart about it, and those of us who are 70-plus, we’ll take care of ourselves.”

In the mean time Fauci has gone missing from the last two press conferences. i'm thinking he and Trump don't see eye to eye on just how flat that curve should be. But hey, if some people gotta die for the economy, some people gotta die.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2020 6:04 am 
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In other news.......

https://www.yahoo.com/news/trump-downpl ... 39863.html
Trump downplays coronavirus threat again, even as number of cases in U.S. surges
“We have a very active flu season, more active than most,” Trump said at a Monday briefing of the White House coronavirus task force, reverting to how he had described the coronavirus throughout February and early March, before he started to take the outbreak more seriously. “It's looking like it's heading to 50,000 or more deaths,” he went on, speaking of flu-related mortality.

He then compared the coronavirus outbreak to another killer of thousands of Americans. “You look at automobile accidents,” Trump said, “which are far greater than any numbers we’re talking about. That doesn't mean we're going to tell everybody no more driving of cars.” About 39,000 people die in vehicular accidents in the United States per year.

The point seemed to be that, as far as mortality numbers go, the coronavirus was not an especially fearsome killer. By that logic, effectively shuttering whole swaths of the economy, Trump said, made little sense.

“We have to do things to get our country open,” Trump said, calling the last several weeks “an incredible period of learning.” He did not say what was learned, or by whom.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2020 8:51 am 
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It's interesting. I guess we're prepared to sacrifice our elderly to the gods of Wall Street, then.

There's another group that's vulnerable at any age. People with pre-existing conditions. Compromised immune systems, history of childhood disease, etc. There's a chance they could die, even at age 20. My brother and I were discussing this the other day, and he said "But they're weak!" (I knew he was joking, of course, but got the point.)

Yeah ... the Republican party has had an agenda of Social Darwinism for a while. Cull the weak. I guess maybe it is time to be more open about this.

Incidentally, even in your 20s, depending on your exposure and other overall factors, there's a good chance you might not die, but you will not be a lucky one with mild symptoms. You will still feel like you WANT to die for about 2 weeks. This idea that the young are invulnerable or immune ... they are not.

We do stuff to reduce the fatalities from auto accidents. People sometimes hate the tradeoffs, but speed limits are a great example. Not everybody follows them, but they save lives. It may slow down your arrival to your destination, but ... same reason.

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Last edited by ProfessorX on Tue Mar 24, 2020 9:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2020 8:56 am 
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I am not advocating violating any local emergency pronouncements. I am currently complying with the work from home rule even though we aren't under a shelter in place rule. I am just suggesting that there might be things we can do to put the nation back to work while protecting those most at risk from this disease.


So, an excellent idea has already been floated.

We have people out of work. We need protective equipment, ventilators, medical facilities. Seems to me we could be putting folks to work making this critical stuff we will need. I don't know if we have to do it the Chinese totalitarian way, but ... something like the CCC.

If the private sector won't do it ... the public sector should.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2020 9:27 am 
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It's interesting. I guess we're prepared to sacrifice our elderly to the gods of Wall Street, then.

There's another group that's vulnerable at any age. People with pre-existing conditions. Compromised immune systems, history of childhood disease, etc. There's a chance they could die, even at age 20. My brother and I were discussing this the other day, and he said "But they're weak!" (I knew he was joking, of course, but got the point.)

Yeah ... the Republican party has had an agenda of Social Darwinism for a while. Cull the weak. I guess maybe it is time to be more open about this.

Incidentally, even in your 20s, depending on your exposure and other overall factors, there's a good chance you might not die, but you will not be a lucky one with mild symptoms. You will still feel like you WANT to die for about 2 weeks. This idea that the young are invulnerable or immune ... they are not.

We do stuff to reduce the fatalities from auto accidents. People sometimes hate the tradeoffs, but speed limits are a great example. Not everybody follows them, but they save lives. It may slow down your arrival to your destination, but ... same reason.

You are exactly right. We mitigate risks all the time. We accept that in most cases we cannot eliminate risk. So we set speed limits and mandate certain safety features for our cars like seat belts and air bags. We don’t tell people to stay home and not drive. We develop flu vaccines and flu therapies. We don’t tell people to stay at home. I realize this is not the flu and circumstances are different so unusual steps to blunt the effect are necessary. My only point is that we cannot do this for an extended period of time without severe damage being done to the economy. This isn’t so much about Wall Street as Main Street. Your friends and neighbors will be affected. So will your students and their parents. So we might want to consider the effect our actions have on our ability to support ourselves after this has passed and consider ways to mitigate those risks as well.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 24, 2020 9:31 am 
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So, an excellent idea has already been floated.

We have people out of work. We need protective equipment, ventilators, medical facilities. Seems to me we could be putting folks to work making this critical stuff we will need. I don't know if we have to do it the Chinese totalitarian way, but ... something like the CCC.

If the private sector won't do it ... the public sector should.

As I understand it the private sector is stepping forward. Ford is retooling to produce masks, shields, respirators and ventilators. It takes a little time to retool but once in place you can mass produce a lot of product.


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